Tag Archives: Rhode Island

paidContent.org: Nice try Newport, but charging system won’t work, says Brady

While commending its decision to ‘try something new’, former WashingtonPost.com executive editor Jim Brady says plans by the Newport (R.I.) Daily News to charge more for online-only subscriptions is fundamentally flawed.

The paper will charge $145 for an annual print subscription; $245 for print and web access; and $345 a year for online-only.

“[T]his model reeks of desperation. It’s as if, having used all of its bullets in the battle to preserve print revenue, Newport has now decided to throw its gun at the problem.

“The issue with Newport’s model is fundamental. It posits that, in the battle for the mindshare of future readers, print actually has a chance of winning out. I do not believe it does,” he writes.

Full post at this link…

Paid content round-up: Newport Daily News, ESPN and thoughts from Salon

The long-running debate around pay walls for online news sites seems to be moving into reality.

Following recent announcements by the Sunday Times and News International, Nieman Journalism Lab has this report on Rhode Island’s Newport Daily News.

The 12,000-circulation paper has introduced a three-tier pricing structure for print/online subscriptions (see the video below).

Meanwhile, paidContent.org reports that ESPN The Magazine is introduced paid-for online content.

On the subject, Salon co-founder Scott Rosenberg’s post is well worth a read (via Mark Potts). Rosenberg has experience in the field – “[A]t Salon we tried every online revenue strategy you can imagine,” he writes.

“Yes, 2009 is different from 2000-2002. But the fundamental lesson remains: you can get some revenue from readers, and there’s nothing wrong with trying; but if in doing so you cut yourself off from the rest of the web in any way, you are dooming yourself to irrelevance and financial decline.”

Britannica.com: Blogosphere, R.I.P?

Britannica dropped us an email to let us know about this post: Nicholas Carr, who sits on their board of advisors, has posted this from his own blog: blogging, has entered its midlife crisis, he writes. No one killed the blogosphere, he says, ‘its death was natural, and foretold’.