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NYU: List of 100 outstanding US journalists of last 100 years

April 3rd, 2012 | No Comments | Posted by in Editors' pick, Journalism

The NYU has released a list of “the 100 outstanding journalists in the United States in the last 100 years.”

In March 2012 the faculty at the Arthur L Carter Journalism Institute at New York University, together with an Honorary Committee of alumni, selected “the 100 outstanding journalists in the United States in the last 100 years”.

The list was selected from more than 300 nominees and was announced at a reception “in honour of the 100th anniversary of journalism education at NYU”, held yesterday.

The list, which can serve as a ‘who’s who’ of US journalism, is at this link.

 

 

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PressThink: The twisted psychology of bloggers v journalists

March 14th, 2011 | No Comments | Posted by in Editors' pick, Online Journalism

Jay Rosen, professor of journalism at New York University, has posted the speech he gave at South by Southwest (SXSW) on Saturday on his blog PressThink. He explores the ongoing bloggers v journalists argument, suggesting that journalists are under five sources of stress, put “right into the face of professional journalism” by bloggers.

One: A collapsing economic model, as print and broadcast dollars are exchanged for digital dimes.

Two: New competition (the loss of monopoly) as a disruptive technology, the Internet, does its thing.

Three. A shift in power. The tools of the modern media have been distributed to the people formerly known as the audience.

Four: A new pattern of information flow, in which “stuff” moves horizontally, peer to peer, as effectively as it moves vertically, from producer to consumer. Audience atomization overcome, I call it.

Five. The erosion of trust (which started a long time ago but accelerated after 2002) and the loss of authority.

Rosen’s full speech is at this link

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NYU: The top 10 journalism works of the decade

April 6th, 2010 | 1 Comment | Posted by in Editors' pick, Journalism

New York University’s Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute has compiled its list of the top 10 works of journalism of the decade 2000-9. The list, which unsurprisingly has a US bias, was whittled down from 80 nominees.

Our purpose was to call attention to and honour work of exceptional importance and quality – journalism that brilliantly met the challenges of this difficult decade.

Top of this inspiring poll is the New York Times’ ‘A Nation Challenged’, a special section published in 2001 looking into the local, national and international impact of the 11 September attacks.

Full list at this link…

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NYC 3.0: Kommons – creating a real-time news platform for specific communities

February 18th, 2010 | No Comments | Posted by in Editors' pick, Social media and blogging

Vadim Lavrusik takes a look at Kommons, a new project from New York University senior and founder of local news blog NYU Local, Cody Brown.

Brown is developing a platform for local news communities, combining the strengths of Twitter and Wikipedia, to create a flow of real-time news and updates in response to specific questions and queries from users. Kommons will focus on issues of trustworthiness and identity of contributors and be tested on a version for New York University:

A profile page has a stream of status updates, but anything that is @tagged by a user in a status message becomes its own wiki-like page that users can edit and add information to in real-time. This means anything can be tagged and have user-created information attached to it. The function applies to users that are tagged. A user has a short background profile, but other users can attach information about that person. In a lot ways, the identity is determined by the community of users similar to how a bio page functions on Wikipedia.

Full story at this link…

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What would a UK-based ProPublica look like?

April 6th, 2009 | No Comments | Posted by in Journalism, Online Journalism

In today’s MediaGuardian, City University of New York (CUNY) journalism professor Jeff Jarvis writes that that foundations will not take over newspapers, à la Scott Trust / Guardian relationship. He told Journalism.co.uk: “It is an empty hope for white knights to save news from inevitable change and business reality. But he says: “We’ll see foundation and public support able to fund a decent number of investigations.”

Yesterday, Journalism.co.uk published comments from New York University (NYU) professor, Jay Rosen, and ProPublica’s managing editor, Stephen Engelberg, as well as from Jarvis in a feature looking at the sustainability of ‘lump sum’ funded journalism – they all said that the point was not to look at ‘one solution’ but at a hybrid of funding opportunities (an issue picked up by Julie Starr here.)

US-based ProPublica, funded by the Sandler Foundation, for example, employs full-time journalists to conduct investigations which are then supplied to other media bodies. Journalism.co.uk raised the point with some of the NYJournalism interviewees (fuller features forthcoming) that similar foundation funding is a bit trickier to come by in the UK: just what would a UK version of ProPublica look like and could it be funded?

Would the equivalent of ProPublica work over here? Or, for that matter, something in the mould of Spot.Us, New America Media, the Huffington Post Investigative Fund, or the Center for Public Integrity?

Last week the Guardian’s Stephen Moss mentioned Paul Bradshaw’s new project, HelpMeInvestigate.com in his giant G2 feature on the troubled regional newspaper industry. It’s a proposal not quite on the scale of ProPublica, which has an annual operating budget of $10 million, and it’s seen success so far, making it to third stage of the (American) Knight News Challenge 2009 and it awaits news of further progress.

How about existing organisations in the UK? There’s the Centre for Investigative Journalism with its annual summer school, but it doesn’t run and supply investigations in the way ProPublica does. There’s MySociety which can help journalists with stories, but is not designed as a primarily journalistic venture.

Author of Flat Earth News, Nick Davies, has previously told the Press Gazette (which has just announced its last issue) about his idea of models of ‘mini-media’.

“It may be that we are looking at funding mini-media or a foundation that will give money to groups of journalists if they can pass the quality threshold,” Davies said at an National Union of Journalists (NUJ) event in January, as Press Gazette reported.

“The greatest question in journalism today is what will be our ‘third source’ of funding,” Davies told Journalism.co.uk last week.

“If advertising and circulation can no longer pay for our editorial operation, we have to find this third source.

“I suspect that place by place and case by case, the answer to the question will be different, a matter of wrapping up whatever package of cash is possible, using donations or grants or sponsorship or micropayments from foundations, rich individuals, local councils, businesses, NGOs, universities – anybody who can understand that the collapse of newspapers is not just about journalists losing their jobs but about everybody losing an essential source of information.

“And in an ideal world, central government would lead the way by setting up a New Media Fund to provide seed money to help these non-profit mini-media to establish themselves and to find their particular third source.”

So could a third source-funded model work? And what shape would it take? It’s a question Journalism.co.uk will continue to ask. Please share your thoughts below.

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New York University journalism student banned from blogging on class

September 22nd, 2008 | 3 Comments | Posted by in Training

In a report for MediaShift, New York University journalism student Alana Taylor called on the institution up its game:

“I was hoping that NYU would offer more classes where I could understand the importance of digital media, what it means, how to adapt to the new way of reporting, and learn from a professor who understands not only where the Internet is, but where it’s going… I am convinced that I am taking the only old-but-new-but-still-old media class in the country,” she wrote.

Commenting on one particular class, ‘Reporting Gen Y (a.k.a. Quarterlifers)’, Taylor acknowledged the talent of her teacher Mary Quigley, but felt let down by the programme’s lack of understanding of social and digital media, twittering her frustration during class.

Taylor’s article prompted the inevitable split of comments between support and accusations of arrogance – a microcosmic version of the response to Tampa Bay intern Jessica da Silva on her blog.

But now Taylor has been told not to blog, Twitter or write about the class again without permission, according to an update from MediaShift.

In response to questions from MediaShift’s Mark Glaser, Quigley said her students were free to blog, twitter, email etc the class after it had finished – adding the caveat that they must ask permission before doing so.

Taylor seems to have been reined in unnecessarily – if her comments had been entirely in praise of the class, there would be no grounds for this blog post.

If NYU has a policy of classes being taught ‘off the record’ then surely this goes against the initiative, observation and analytical thinking that the school is trying to teach and instead discourages students from putting these skills into action?

For those commenters on Taylor’s original post accusing her of being a know-it-all – isn’t the university claiming the same thing if it doesn’t allow its students to freely give feedback like this?

Teachers from the course could instead have interacted with the criticism and opened up the discussion – who knows, other students might benefit from hearing about and witnessing Taylor’s social media experience first hand.

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MediaShift: New York University journalism programme lacks digital focus, says student

September 8th, 2008 | No Comments | Posted by in Editors' pick, Journalism, Training

Alana Taylor, journalism student at NYU and self-professed social and digital media fan, has criticised the university’s journalism programme for its failure to address digital trends and technology.

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PressThink: Defining citizen journalism

July 16th, 2008 | No Comments | Posted by in Citizen journalism, Editors' pick

“When the people formerly known as the audience employ the press tools they have in their possession to inform one another, that’s citizen journalism,” says Jay Rosen, professor of journalism at New York University.

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