Nieman Journalism Lab: Barriers to entry can improve quality and quantity of reader comments, says Gawker

In 2009, blog network Gawker Media introduced a new, stricter commenting system in an attempt to free the site from certain readers who were dominating comment threads. Nieman Journalism Lab has the full rundown of how the system now works, which includes trusted commenters having greater access to discussions and most recent comments placed at the top rather than bottom of threads to steer discussion.

“We’ll be able to encourage the kind of discussion that *we* want – not one that is dominated merely by the most prolific of our commenters. It’s our party; we get to decide who comes,” wrote founder Nick Denton at the time.

A graph on the blog of Gawker Media chief technology officer Tom Plunkett shows an initial dip in comment volume when the changes were first made, followed by a steep incline:

Though there were some calls to do so, purging commenter accounts is not a solution for the out-of-control commenter community. Nor is a large moderation staff. We believe pruning, and a commenting platform as we have implemented, will lead to increased participation, while at the same time encouraging quality. This data, and the subjective opinion of many, seem to back this assertion.

Full Nieman Journalism Lab report at this link…

One thought on “Nieman Journalism Lab: Barriers to entry can improve quality and quantity of reader comments, says Gawker

  1. Mala Bhargava

    The company i work with (Mindworks Global) does comment moderation for newspapers who outsource this job. One of the papers we worked with had forums infested with offensive commenters. We had to do a lot of deleting and at first things got worse as commenters became infuriated at their comments disappearing. It took a few weeks for it to settle down and many more weeks for it to develop an atmosphere where people made useful contributions to the discussion.

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