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#Podcast: How news outlets offer personalisation on digital platforms

August 30th, 2013 | 1 Comment | Posted by in Podcast

In efforts to grow engagement on digital platforms and give some organisation to the wealth of information online, many news outlets offer personalisation features, delivering relevant content to individual users.

This can be based on a number of different factors, such as their location, their interests and in some cases their social media connections.

In this week’s podcast we look at a number of different approaches in the news industry to personalisation: from how publisher service Near You Now aims to surface locally-relevant content to how the Financial Times’s web app recommends content based on browser history. We also look at the role personalisation plays in interactive content and the selection of content on news reader apps.

We also speak to City University London professor Steve Schifferes about his report from last year on personalisation, which he co-authored with Dr Neil Thurman.

The podcast hears from:

  • Bede McCarthy, group product manager for content, Financial Times
  • Professor Steve Schifferes, director of Financial Journalism MA, City University London
  • Sean Clarke, head of interactives, the Guardian
  • Anthony Sheehan, founder, Near You Now, Xylitic
  • Martin Stoddart, vice president of business development, Zite

You can hear future podcasts by signing up to the Journalism.co.uk iTunes podcast feed.

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App of the week for journalists: Zite

App of the week: Zite

Operating systems: Apple: iPhone or iPad

Cost: Free

What is it and how is it of use to journalists? If you are feeling overwhelmed by the number of RSS feeds, tweets with links to articles and other social media sources you are tasked with checking, download Zite.

Released first as a personalised magazine for iPad, an iPhone app was launched not long before Christmas and offers a fantastic way of finding stories you may have missed.

Zite mashes together your Twitter, Google Reader and Read It Later feeds and delivers posts around your subject area.

Not only does Zite surface posts you may miss using Twitter and RSS, it is intelligent and allows your to teach it exactly what you like and don’t like via thumbs up, thumbs down buttons displayed on the story.

Zite will automatically work out your niche interests, which appear as categories along the top of the iPhone app and can be swiped through.

You can, of course, share to Twitter, email, Facebook and other services, including Evernote and Pinboard.

Zite’s advantage could also be its downside: it only delivers a handful of stories rather than many every minute as Twitter does (presuming you are following lots of sources). To some this may be a disadvantage, to others they will enjoy reading the manageable amount of interesting posts the app unearths.

Have you got a favourite app that you use as a journalist? Fill in this form to nominate an app for Journalism.co.uk’s app of the week for journalists.

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Mashable: Why CNN has acquired iPad magazine Zite

August 31st, 2011 | No Comments | Posted by in Editors' pick, Mobile

Mashable has Q&A with CNN’s general manager of digital, KC Estenson, and CEO of Zite Mark Johnson explaining why the broadcaster has acquired the personalised iPad magazine.

Zite, like Flipboard, is an iPad app that allows users to aggregate news articles from feeds including Twitter and Google Reader to create a fully personalised magazine of the content of interest.

CNN announced on it’s blog yesterday that Zite will remain fully independent, a fact Estenson confirms in Mashable’s interview saying Zite will be free to pursue partnerships with other news organisations.

The interview starts by asking “why Zite?”.

Estenson: We saw in Zite a best-in-class product. It’s deeply loved by the people who have it, and we thought it would be a nice addition to our digital portfolio. Secondly, there’s great technology behind it. We’re seeing a lot of interest in this space now, but these guys have been working on this for six years.

Johnson: The iPad is really well suited to reading. I think what’s interesting about Zite is that it brings you really interesting information you might not have otherwise read. It’s not just repackaging information.

We’re seeing Flipboard move into TV and film, while Pulse is getting into bookmarklets and extensions. Where is Zite going next?

Johnson: We still see a huge market in giving you the information most relevant to you. We’re focusing on content right now, news-type content. We really want to focus on giving people a great personalised iPad magazine.

The interview goes on to ask:

Can we expect CNN’s content to feature more prominently on Zite in the future?

Johnson: Absolutely not. Our personalisation algorithms look for most interesting content on the web, whether that comes from CNN or elsewhere. Our algorithms are completely agnostic.

The full Q&A is at this link

 

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Review: Pressjack, software to create digital magazines

Pressjack allows users to turn RSS feeds and online content into a page-turning digital magazine within minutes, which can then be shared by email or social networking sites.

What is it?
The best way to answer that is to view an example. Here is one we made earlier. You will need Adobe Flash to view it.

Pressjack joins Flipboard and Zite the category of social magazines. But unlike Flipboard and Zite, which are for iPad and designed to tailor make a magazine based on content flagged up by people from your social networks, Pressjack is designed so you use your own web content – which includes text, photos and video – to create a digital magazine for your customers or readers.

The current version is Flash-based so cannot be viewed on the iPad or iPhone but a HTML5 version is in development and due to be released this summer.

PressJack

Three ideas of how Pressjack could be used by news organisations?

1. Local newspapers offering regional print editions of jobs and property supplements could produce tailored, more localised digital versions using Pressjack;
2. Create an weekly newsletter and email the link to the magazine to your subscribers, as we have done here;
3. Create a special supplement – such as after an election or event – to be emailed out and posted to Twitter and Facebook.

What you need to know about Pressjack

Pressjack is currently in beta and users can register to download the free software. Later it will be possible to upgrade to the enterprise or pro versions, which will have additional features such as the ability to add your own advertising (instead of Pressjack’s advertising) and host the magazine on your own site.

Developers hope Pressjack will be out of beta by mid-July. Paul McNulty managing director of Trinity Innovations, the company behind Pressjack, told Journalism.co.uk:

We took the decision to release the product and start engaging people. We made a lot of assumptions but we’re now including the user in the next step.

The product came about as a way to promote Trinity Innovations’ main product, page-turning eBook software called 3D Issue. “Eloquent organisation is what this tool is all about”, McNulty said.

Pressjack has a few limitations but developers are improving it all the time. When I first tried it, just three weeks ago, the user interface and the customisations were not a patch on what they are now.

The verdict: Pressjack is great at doing what it sets out to do: allow you to easily create a digital magazine. It is quick – it took me less than 10 minutes to download the software and create this example magazine – and the end product is nicely designed.

The downside is your magazine is hosted elsewhere (though you can upgrade to give you the ability to host your own publication) and it can’t be embedded.

Will customers follow the link? Do they all have Flash? Are readers’ internet connections fast enough to see the magazines before clicking to close the window? I’m not sure. My main problem though is that I am just not a fan of the format: of page-turning online publications.

How to: create a digital magazine using Pressjack

1. Register for the trial version and download and install the software;
2. In the “content” tab, click “add” and give your magazine a name (Journalism.co.uk’s weekly newsletter, for example);
3. Add RSS feeds by clicking “all feeds” and click the + button to the top right of the screen (I added our “news”, “blogs”, “jobs” and “press releases” feeds;
4. Drag and drop the RSS feeds onto the name of you magazine;

5. Click the “articles” tab. You can now edit the individual stories or delete any you don’t want to include (it is not possible to batch delete, unfortunately). You will be able to see associated pictures, which you can choose to omit. Click “build”;
6. Click the “output” tab and Pressjack will build your magazine. This may take a few minutes depending on the number of stories you’re including.

7. At this point users have the option to customise the colours and the design. There are also options to add Google Analytics ID so that stories read in the digital magazine will be counted in web stats.
8. Click “publish” and the magazine will be uploaded to Pressjack’s site. You will be given a URL, which you can email or post on social networking sites or your own site.

Let us know if you use Pressjack by leaving a comment below or by sending us a message @journalismnews

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