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App of the week for journalists: Splice, an easy video editor

App of the week: Splice

Phones: iPhone

Cost: Free (£2.49 to go ad-free)

What is it? Splice is an easy-to-use video editor for iPhone. The best thing is that you won’t need to read a guide to the app before using it.

You can batch add video clips or photos already on your phone, trim the clips and select transitions and add titles.

It is fairly intuitive but if you get stuck there’s a short video that will get you started.

You can export to the iPhone’s camera roll and from there you can send by email, upload to YouTube or connect your phone by USB and add the edited video to your computer.

How is it of use to journalists?

Have you got a favourite app that you use as a journalist? Fill in this form to nominate an app for Journalism.co.uk’s app of the week for journalists.

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App of the week for journalists: SoundNote, an iPad app for interviews

October 31st, 2012 | No Comments | Posted by in App of the Week

App of the week: SoundNote

Devices: iPad

Cost: £2.99

What is it? An iPad app built by a student journalist, for students and journalists. SoundNote lets you record an interview while taking notes, with the written text acting as a marker. When you payback the audio and tap a word, the recording jumps to that point in the audio. You can also draw sketches which are linked to the audio.

How is it of use to journalists?

This app has an interesting story behind it. It was created by a journalism student from Seattle who paid off his student loan with income from the app.

It was made with both journalists and students in mind and is a great way of taking notes and finding the correct point in the audio.

For example, if I interview someone who gives me certain stats, I could note the figures at the time. I could later check them or take a quote from the audio by simply tapping on the figure and jumping to that point in the recording.

The app can also be used to sketch or write freehand and the drawing can then be used to skip to the relevant part of the audio.

The SoundNote files can be shared by email or over a wifi network.

Recommended by: @andrewhennigan

Have you got a favourite app that you use as a journalist? Fill in this form to nominate an app for Journalism.co.uk’s app of the week for journalists.

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App of the week for journalists: Facebook Pages Manager

App of the week: Pages Manager

Phones: iPhone. Android users can use Mobile Page Manager.

Cost: Free

What is it? An app for managing your Facebook page

How is it of use to journalists? This app is one for any journalist who manages their news site’s Facebook page.

Pages Manager allows you to view notifications, messages, new ‘likes’ and insights (Facebook analytics). You can also share photos and add status updates.

 

Have you got a favourite app that you use as a journalist? Fill in this form to nominate an app for Journalism.co.uk’s app of the week for journalists.

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App of the week for journalists: Prismatic, for filtering social news

App of the week: Prismatic

Phones: iPhone

Cost: free

What is it? A social newsreader app that lets you see and respond to tweets about a news story.

How is it of use to journalists? Prismatic gives journalists a way of filtering and personalising news feeds on an iPhone.

Journalism.co.uk has highlighted several social newsreaders in ‘app of the week’ including Flipboard and Zite.

As with other social newsreader apps (there’s a list of 10 here), Prismatic asks users to connect one or more accounts, such as Twitter, Facebook, and Google Reader. You can also set your location to gather news feeds from your area.

Prismatic then mashes the news sources, delivering a personalised news feed.

 

One feature that helps Prismatic stand out from the crowd of other social news reader apps is that you are able to see a few tweets at the bottom of a news story (see the picture above right). And in addition to reading the tweets, you can reply or retweet from within the app.

Once you have created an account you can also view your feeds on a desktop.

Hat tip: ReadWriteWeb, which has a feature on Prismatic, which explains ‘how to filter the social web on your mobile‘.

Have you got a favourite app that you use as a journalist? Fill in this form to nominate an app for Journalism.co.uk’s app of the week for journalists.

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App of the week for journalists: Tout, for sharing videos WSJ-style

App of the week: Tout

Phones: iPhone, Android

Cost: free

What is it? An app that allows you to record and share 15-second video clips.

How is it of use to journalists? Last week we reported on how and why Wall Street Journal reporters are sharing short videos filmed on their mobile phones.

The news site has created WorldStream, a micro-video blog by reporters, to provide context and “impressionistic colour”, Liz Heron, director of social media and engagement at the Wall Street Journal, told Journalism.co.uk.

Reporters provide the content by using a customised version of Tout, modified to allow WSJ reporters to post clips of up to 45 seconds.

 

Heron told Journalism.co.uk how readers are far more likely to view a short video clip shared on social media than a long film.

Other journalists can take inspiration and use the app to create and share smartphone footage. Tout also allows you to connect with the network of users, which includes 400 WSJ reporters.

Have you got a favourite app that you use as a journalist? Fill in this form to nominate an app for Journalism.co.uk’s app of the week for journalists.

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App of the week for journalists: Push Reader

August 29th, 2012 | No Comments | Posted by in App of the Week

App of the week: Push Reader

Phones: iPhone

Cost: £1.49

What is it? An app that delivers push notifications of selected Google Reader RSS feeds. It’s a particularly useful app for journalists.

How is it of use to journalists? Many journalists follow news related to their beat or niche by setting up and following RSS feeds.

If you would like to receive push notifications on your iPhone of particular feeds set up in Google Reader, this iPhone app is for you.

 

One advantage is that you can set “do not disturb” times so that you don’t receive notifications during the night, for example. As with other apps with push notifications, you can select to turn off the sound alerts.

Have you got a favourite app that you use as a journalist? Fill in this form to nominate an app for Journalism.co.uk’s app of the week for journalists.

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Tool of the week for journalists: Conweets, for tracking Twitter conversations

Tool of the week: Conweets

What is it? A tool to track Twitter conversations between two people.

How is it of use to journalists? If you have ever had to look for a public Twitter spat or conversation between two users you may have used Bettween or the conversation tracking function in Tweetbot (which can turn a conversation into a Storify from within the app).

Bettween has now closed its doors but a new platform called Conweets launched earlier this month that allows you to track conversations between two users. You can get conversations going back several months.

Another handy function is that if you enter just one Twitter handle, you will see a list all the conversations that user has had and be able to track a conversation from that list.

This could be a really useful tool when reaching out to new sources. For example, find a key person contributing interesting tweets to an unfolding news story and see who they are speaking to and how frequently.

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App of the week for journalists: Njuice, for surfacing trending news stories

App of the week: Njuice

Phones: iPhone, iPad, web (and soon-to-be on Android)

Cost: Free

What is it? Njuice is an app and website that allows you to see what stories are trending on Twitter, Facebook and other social networks

How is it of use to journalists? Njuice is a social reader for surfacing trending stories in real-time. The app displays the story and an orange triangle tells you how many times the story has been shared.

 

Where Njuice differs from social readers such as Flipboard, Zite and Pulse is that Njuice focusses on what is trending.

And where the beauty of other social newsreaders is personalisation, journalists can select Njuice to see what stories are trending globally, stories which they may not learn about in apps delivering personalised content.

There are some personalisation options in Njuice, with options to follow categories such as “technology” and “world news”, but one of the strengths of the app is to see what is trending overall.

(Incidentally the most shared story, with more than 27,000 shares, was TMZ’s post of Prince Harry’s Vegas photos, so we didn’t include the “top news” screengrab).

Have you got a favourite app that you use as a journalist? Fill in this form to nominate an app for Journalism.co.uk’s app of the week for journalists.

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App of the week for journalists: Vodio, ‘Flipboard for video’

App of the week: Vodio

Devices: iPhone, iPad

Cost: Free

What is it? An app that uses your Twitter, Facebook and YouTube feeds to give you a mash-up of videos. Like Flipboard, but for video. It was released on iPad in January and has just been released for iPhone.

How is it of use to journalists? Vodio (not to be confused with Voddio) provides a selection of videos shared by your Twitter and Facebook connections, adds films from channels you follow on YouTube, plus allows you to select categories within the app (such as ‘tech’, ‘apps’ etc).

Scroll horizontally and you are delivered videos from the different ‘channels’ (Twitter, Facebook, YouTube) and a vertical swipe displays the videos. Turning the device on its side allows you to view videos full screen.

It is like Flipboard, an app that displays articles (and audio) based on your social networks. And in the same way that Flipboard provides and easy, lean-back way for journalists to follow sources, so does Vodio.

Reviews: Vodio gets 4.5 stars in the iTunes App Store.

Have you got a favourite app that you use as a journalist? Fill in this form to nominate an app for Journalism.co.uk’s app of the week for journalists.

Hat tip: Mashable

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App of the week for journalists: FiLMiC Pro, for manual control when filming on iPhone

August 2nd, 2012 | No Comments | Posted by in App of the Week

App of the week: FiLMiC Pro

Devices: iPhone

Cost: £2.49

What is it? An iPhone app for recording video that offers manual control over sound, white balance, focus and exposure.

How is it of use to journalists? FiLMiC Pro is a video recording iPhone app that gives you manual control over image resolution and frame rate, offers an audio meter to monitor sound visually, allows GPS tagging and has a white balance function.

It beats the iPhone standard camera app when filming in areas where light is low as you can adjust the resolution and frame rate.

Adjusting the settings also allows you to save to the “FiLMiC library” which can then by synced with iTunes. This saves filling disc space in the phone’s “camera roll”.

Another setting worth adjusting is the audio. Selecting the “uncompressed” option rather than “compressed” will increase the file size of the video but will improve sound quality.

  • Have you got a favourite app that you use as a journalist? Fill in this form to nominate an app for Journalism.co.uk’s app of the week for journalists.
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