Browse > Home /

#Tip: 10 words to cull from your copy

April 24th, 2014 | No Comments | Posted by in Top tips for journalists

Tight writing is one of the cornerstones of good journalism, especially in news – an article should relay the necessary information in the clearest, most concise manner. It helps if you can be entertaining where appropriate but the same tenets should hold true.

Canada’s The Globe and Mail recently published a post on words that professional writers should look to avoid, words that act as filler rather than contributing to the meaning of a sentence or weaken the copy were a stronger word would lift it.

For more writing tips check out this Journalism.co.uk guide on tools and resources to improve your writing.

 

Tags: , , ,

Similar posts:

#Tip: Remember these science writing tips for getting more from a study

April 4th, 2014 | No Comments | Posted by in Top tips for journalists
Image by Horia Varlan on Flickr. Some rights reserved

Image by Horia Varlan on Flickr. Some rights reserved

Science stories always have the power to fire the imagination of the reader so it is important to be able to relay new discoveries or important announcements well.

Unfortunately, as Ian Sample says in this Guardian guide to science writing, most stories are based on published papers, not all of which are interesting, important or even accurate.

He’s put together ten tips on writing good science pieces as the first in a series on the subject that is well worth following for aspiring science writers out there.

Tags: , , , ,

Similar posts:

#Tip: Revisit this Q&A for long-form journalism pointers

September 30th, 2013 | No Comments | Posted by in Top tips for journalists

With the range of platforms dedicated to the publication of long-form content online continuing to grow, a recent Q&A run by Poynter with Roy Peter Clark, a US author and writing tutor, which offers tips on producing long-form content, seems rather timely. Questions (and answers) cover planning and research for long-form, as well as finding the right length at the end.

If you have a tip you would like to submit to us at Journalism.co.uk email us using this link.
Tags: , ,

Similar posts:

#Tip: Advice on editing your own writing

July 12th, 2013 | No Comments | Posted by in Top tips for journalists

“Be your own editor” is a phrase constantly directed at trainee journalists and writers on the whole, but many writers often end up reading what they meant rather than what they actually wrote, developing a “snow-blindness” to their own work.

Over at Prof KRG, Kenna Griffin has put together some tips for writers on editing their own work. Whether it is pinned above your desk or  permanently committed to memory, these points should be a checklist to run through after every piece of work is finished.

If you have a tip you would like to submit to us at Journalism.co.uk email us using this link.
Tags: , , , ,

Similar posts:

#Tip: Writing and reporting advice from some masters of the craft

May 30th, 2013 | No Comments | Posted by in Top tips for journalists

Roy Peter Clark has been teaching the art or writing and reporting for more than 30 years, authoring numerous books and appearing on television to talk about his craft.

He recently taught at a conference hosted by the Washington Post and posted this article on Poynter after hearing David Finkel, Bob Woodward, DeNeen L. Brown and Ezra Klein detail what they believe makes the difference in modern writing.

If you have a tip you would like to submit to us at Journalism.co.uk email us using this link.

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Similar posts:

#Tip of the day for journalists: Understanding different lead types and improving writing

September 17th, 2012 | No Comments | Posted by in Top tips for journalists

Poynter has an online chat with Roy Peter Clark which offers advice on how to write better leads. He also outlines the different types of leads that exist, such as – in his words – the straight lead, the anecdotal lead, the explainer, the question, the summary and the grabber.

See the full post here.

If you have a tip you would like to submit to us at Journalism.co.uk email us using this link.

Tags: , ,

Similar posts:

#Tip of the day from Journalism.co.uk – avoiding common mistakes in web writing

On his Online Journalism Blog Paul Bradshaw has posted a list of mistakes “made repeatedly by first-time web writers” and offers detailed advice using examples on how to avoid them and improve writing standards. The post refers to issues such as linking to sources, headlines and the use of block quotes.

Read his full post on his Online Journalism Blog.

Tipster: Rachel McAthy

If you have a tip you would like to submit to us at Journalism.co.uk email us using this link– we will pay a fiver for the best ones published.

Tags: , , ,

Similar posts:

#Tip of the day from Journalism.co.uk – how to quote sources responsibly

Over on Poynter there is a useful copy of a live chat with Roy Peter Clark, author of “Writing Tools: 50 Essential Strategies for Every Writer” looking at the use of quotes. Questions posed at the start of the post include: what defines a good quote; what’s the ideal length for a quote; whether you can “tinker” with quotes for clarity and the chat also touches on using social media for reaction.

See a playback of the live chat here.

Tipster: Rachel McAthy

If you have a tip you would like to submit to us at Journalism.co.uk email us using this link – we will pay a fiver for the best ones published.

Tags: , , , ,

Similar posts:

#Tip of the day from Journalism.co.uk – questions to ask before reporting

May 24th, 2011 | No Comments | Posted by in Top tips for journalists

This ‘how to’ post on Poynter suggests a series of questions journalists should consider before reporting on a story, in a bid to find a better focus. Author of the post Tom Huang recommends editors get involved in this conversation to limit the revisions a story will need further down the line. Tipster: Rachel McAthy.

To submit a tip to Journalism.co.uk, use this link – we will pay a fiver for the best ones published.

Tags: , , , ,

Similar posts:

Newsless: On providing news and context

February 20th, 2009 | No Comments | Posted by in Editors' pick, Journalism

“We don’t just cover the news for the sake of telling people what happened; we cover the news to help our communities understand themselves better, so they can improve (…) the trail of a story doesn’t end with the passage of a bill or the resignation of an official. It doesn’t end at all. It merely connects with more and more dots that form an ever-clearer picture of a better society,” writes Newsless.

via News as a hook for context at Newsless.org.

Tags: , ,

Similar posts:

© Mousetrap Media Ltd. Theme: modified version of Statement