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#Tip of the day for journalists: Embed Instagram images in your blog

By Potzuyoko on Flickr. Some rights reserved.

By Potzuyoko on Flickr. Some rights reserved.

WordPress this week announced that it was introducing the ability to easily embed Instagram images in WordPress.com blogs.

All you need to do is paste the URL of the Instagram picture in the visual text view and the image will show.

The feature has not yet been introduced for those with self-hosted WordPress.org accounts. According to The Next Web, this will be introduced “in the near future”.

If you have a tip you would like to submit to us at Journalism.co.uk email us using this link.

 

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#Tip of the day for journalists: Geotag your content using a WordPress plugin

October 19th, 2012 | No Comments | Posted by in Top tips for journalists

If you are a journalist for a news outlet where location is a key part of the story (such as a local or hyperlocal news site), it is worth geotagging your stories to help search engines deliver local results.

This post from the Knight Digital Media Center has a list of WordPress plugins that geotag your content.

One of the plugins, called Geolocation Plus, also allows you to great GeoRSS feeds. Location-based feeds have huge potential. They may further develop as a way Google and other search engines return results based on a person’s location; they may be used by social newsreader apps as a way of delivering local news; and they have huge potential for mobile news reading other areas.

For example, see this post from earlier in the week as it explains how Sarah Hartley has been experimenting with location-based feeds in her role at n0tice and for an augmented reality initiative by Talk About Local.

It is also well worth reading this post by Matt McAlister on why publishers should consider GeoRSS.

If you have a tip you would like to submit to us at Journalism.co.uk email us using this link.

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App of week for journalists: WordPress, now with easy comments moderation

May 31st, 2012 | No Comments | Posted by in App of the Week

App of the week: WordPress

Devices: iPhone, iPad, Android

Cost: Free

What is it? WordPress for iOS has new features, including easy comments moderation, push notifications (for WordPress.com) and improved iPad performance.

How is it of use to journalists? Journalists and bloggers who use WordPress may have dismissed the thought of using it on a phone as it is far less fiddly to write a blog post and add pictures from a desktop.

However, version 3.0 of the iOS app, released last week, has a number of new features worth knowing about.

Perhaps the most useful of these is the ability to moderate comments with a simple swipe gesture.

  

A post introducing the new features describes the “swipe-to-moderate toolbar”.

Swipe over any comment in the comments list to bring up a moderation toolbar – no need to use bulk moderation or go to the comment permalink. It’s right there, and it’s fast. Another nifty change is the highlighting of new comments in the comments list when you’ve refreshed, it makes it easy to see what’s new.

If like this Journalism.co.uk editors’ blog, which runs on WordPress, you get a high volume of comments – most of them spam – this feature that allows you to easily moderate from your phone is a plus.

Bloggers using WordPress.com-hosted blogs have another new feature for comments: push notifications alerting you when a comment has been posted.

The updated version seems more stable on iPad, with 44 bugs and crashes fixed for this release.

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Tool of the week for journalists – TimeKiwi, to create social media timelines

Tool of the week: TimeKiwi

What is it? A new tool to turn tweets, blog posts and Instagram photos into a timeline. Add a Twitter handle, a Tumblr, WordPress and Posterous blog and an Instagram account and TimeKiwi will mash them into a combined timeline.

How is it of use to journalists? For storytelling. The tool allows you to demonstrate how a story has progressed. The tool does not require you to authorise the app so you can add any Twitter handle to see how that person’s tweets have played out over time.

Take this example of a timeline of canon Dr Giles Fraser who resigned from his role as chancellor of St Paul’s Cathedral last week over plans to forcibly evict Occupy protesters. Adding his @giles_fraser handle allows you to show his tweets as either a vertical or horizontal timeline.

The free version of TimeKiwi cannot be embedded so it is of limited use in telling a story on your site but you can still share links to created timelines. A “business” version is in the pipeline which promises an embed feature and custom views which could be of particular interest to journalists who can then show mapped out tweets and blog posts within a news story.

This TimeKiwi takes in the @journalismnews Twitter account and the Journalism.co.uk WordPress blog.

 


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#Tip of the day from Journalism.co.uk – how to cross-post Google+ posts to a WordPress blog

Today’s tip explains how to cross-post your Google+ posts to your WordPress blog.

The Next Web tells you how you can do this using a WordPress plugin, Google+Blog.

The plugin lets you import your posts automatically to WordPress with next to no effort. Simply download and install the plugin, follow the instructions listed [in the article], and you’ll be able to share your Google+ posts with your blog followers who don’t have an account on the social networking site. There are two versions of the plugin – a paid and a free version, both of which you can download here.

The article guides you through installing the plugin.

Tipster: Sarah Marshall

If you have a tip you would like to submit to us at Journalism.co.uk email us using this link – we will pay a fiver for the best ones published.

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#Tip of the day from Journalism.co.uk – phone and tablet tricks for blogging from the field

September 2nd, 2011 | No Comments | Posted by in Mobile, Social media and blogging

The 10,000 Words blog has posted five top tricks for filing blog posts from the field using WordPress.com. The tips include WordPress’ mobile apps, adding hyperlinks, call-in audio posts and adding geolocation to posts.

Read them all here.

Tipster: Rachel McAthy

If you have a tip you would like to submit to us at Journalism.co.uk email us using this link – we will pay a fiver for the best ones published.

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#Tip of the day from Journalism.co.uk – WordPress themes for journalists

The 10,000 Words blog has this week published a post listing seven premium WordPress themes for journalists, costing between $17 and $69. This article follows an earlier post on seven great free WordPress themes.

So what’s the difference in using a premium WordPress theme aside from the price? For starters, support and compatibility. Purchasing a premium WordPress theme ensures that you will have a direct channel of contact to the theme designer to answer any technical questions, and the theme you purchased will have been tested thoroughly in all of the major browsers. Premium WordPress themes may often come with a guarantee for free updates, increased admin options, and the opportunity to download multiple themes if you purchase from a theme club like WooThemes or NattyWP.

Tipster: Sarah Marshall

If you have a tip you would like to submit to us at Journalism.co.uk email us using this link – we will pay a fiver for the best ones published.

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WordPress rolls out Twitter and Facebook comments options

WordPress has launched a three-way commenting system allowing people to use their WordPress, Twitter or Facebook account to leave a comment on a WordPress blog or news site.

Readers can decide which identity they use to leave comments and, after authenticating accounts, can toggle between the three options before posting.

Announcing the new commenting system on its blog, WordPress said:

And since you know your readers well, you can now change the text above the comment box to be whatever you like. We recommend using the default we are applying to new blogs, “What are you thinking?”, as questions often encourage more comments, but you can change it to whatever you like by going to your dashboard, then Settings → Discussion.

Further Twitter and Facebook integration is also planned, the blogging platform announced.

Related article: Facebook v Disqus: Ten pros and cons for using Facebook comments

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#Tip of the day from Journalism.co.uk – using online platforms in student journalism

Student journalists using online blog platforms for the first time, either for a project or the real thing, may find these tips from Freelance Unbound useful advice on how to get the most out of platforms such as WordPress. Tipster: Rachel McAthy.

To submit a tip to Journalism.co.uk, use this link – we will pay a fiver for the best ones published.

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#Tip of the day from Journalism.co.uk – WordPress plugins for the newsroom

November 25th, 2010 | No Comments | Posted by in Top tips for journalists

Blogging: 10,000 Words has pulled together six WordPress plugins that are worth having for your newsroom blog or website. Tipster: Laura Oliver.

To submit a tip to Journalism.co.uk, use this link – we will pay a fiver for the best ones published.

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