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CNBC, New York Times and Vanity Fair recognised at US business journalism awards

June 30th, 2010 | No Comments | Posted by in Awards

Winners of the US-based business journalism awards, the Gerald Loeb Awards, were announced yesterday, with CNBC, the New York Times and Vanity Fair each claiming two awards.

New York Times assistant investigative editor Walt Bogdanich was given the Lifetime Achievement Award, while chief mergers and acquisitions reporter, Andrew Ross Sorkin was awarded a Loeb for his book, ‘Too Big to Fail’.

The awards were established in 1957 by Gerald Loeb, to honour journalists who contribute to the understanding of business, finance and the economy.

See a full list of the winners and their entries here…

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Women don’t fare too well on the power league lists

December 8th, 2008 | No Comments | Posted by in Journalism, Newspapers

The Observer’s Women’s Special in the Review section, spanning 80 years of history, made interesting reading over the weekend: apparently men still dominate the top levels of media, politics, finance and … church. Of note were the ‘big lists’ split into male/female ratio. Here are those relevant to the media sector (percentages refer to the female portion of the list):

• Sunday Times Rich List: 1%
Of 95 women listed in the top 1,000, 56 are half of male-female partnerships.

• Vanity Fair ‘New Establishment’ 100: 9%
Three women feature as part of male-female partnerships; only one woman – Angelina Jolie – in top ten.

• Telegraph 100 Living Geniuses: 15%
No women feature in top 30.

• Media Guardian Top 100: 21%
One woman, BBC’s Jane Tranter, in top ten.

• Entertainment Weekly 50 Smartest People in Hollywood: 24%
Two women in top 25.

• Evening Standard 1001 Powerful Londoners: 27%.

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‘How to Lose Friends and Alienate People’ tops the UK box office

October 8th, 2008 | No Comments | Posted by in Journalism

The film of Toby Young’s book, depicting his failed five-year attempt to make it in the U.S, as a contributing editor at Vanity Fair, has shot to the top of the UK box office in its opening weekend.

‘How to Lose Friends and Alienate People’ took £1.5 million over the weekend according to Screen International. It has, so far, failed to enjoy the same success in the US.

Young was accused of plagiarism by New York magazine, last week. He has been accused of lifting passages from a June 16, 1996, New York Times story by John Tierney.

Young’s response in the magazine:  “I don’t think it’s a sort of mealy-mouthed or weasely defense to say that the standard that British journalists are expected to hold themselves to are not as high as the standards that some American journalists hold,” he explained. “We’re a little less precious about this kind of thing.”

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The beast is unleashed: looking at Tina Brown’s new site

October 7th, 2008 | No Comments | Posted by in Online Journalism

As reported all over the shop, yesterday saw the launch of the online news aggregator site, The Daily Beast, captained by former editor of Tatler, Vanity Fair and The NewYorker, Tina Brown, and backed by Barry Diller, of IAC/InterActiveCorp.

PaidContent had managed a sneak preview, but the likes of Roy Greenslade, and Journalism.co.uk had to wait till its official grand unveiling yesterday afternoon.

Named after the fictional tabloid in Evelyn Waugh’s 1938 novel, Scoop, Tina Brown describes The Daily Beast, on her site, as: “the omnivorous friend who hears about the best stuff and forwards it to you with a twist.”

Her motley crew boasts the satirist Chris Buckley, former McCain adviser Mark McKinnon, Project Runway’s Laura Bennett and Facebook’s Randi Zuckerberg.

The site’s bold red and black design has a large list of contributors and features a collection of news, opinion, blogs, links and video.

Over at Cyber Journalist Net they reckon it’s ‘about 30 percent original content’ and Gawker is having fun speculating about Brown’s spending habits.

Opinion in the US seems to be split on the site: Deadline Hollywood’s Nikki Finke thinks it ‘sucks’, but as the New York Observer points out she said that about Huffington as well.

Steve Johnson at the Chicago Tribune reckons there’s irony in the choice of title but doesn’t think that necessarily matters.

With absolutely no advertising on the site, it will be interesting to see whether The Daily Beast can survive in the online jungle. It seems to have had a lion’s share of initial hype at least.

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Vanity Fair: Rupert Murdoch interviewed by Michael Wolff

September 3rd, 2008 | No Comments | Posted by in Editors' pick

An extract from Michael Wolff’s forthcoming book, The Man Who Owns the News, in October’s Vanity Fair, which, among other revelations, details how he acted as a peace broker between Barack Obama and his Fox News Network.

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Video: Christopher Hitchens gets waterboarded

July 4th, 2008 | No Comments | Posted by in Journalism

For his latest Vanity Fair article, Believe me, it’s torture, Christopher Hitchens underwent a session of waterboarding to test whether it amounts to torture (hat tip Greenslade)

Here’s the video:

Here also is the video of a investigative reporter from Current TV’s vanguard journalism strand beating him to the punch by undergoing the procedure for a piece that ran on the peer-to-peer news network about eight months ago:

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Vanity Fair’s view of the blogosphere

June 16th, 2008 | No Comments | Posted by in Social media and blogging

Vanity Fair has created a ‘blogopticon‘ mapping out what it considers to be the most influential (US-based) bloggers.

Divided by a vertical axis stretching from ‘news’ to ‘opinion’ and a horizontal ranging from ‘scurrilous’ to ‘earnest’, 75 blogs are featured.

Sites such as Wonkette, TMZ and ValleyWag are included with descriptions of each provided as you scroll over.

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