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#Tip: Guide to using Spundge for live coverage

Image by stevendepolo on Flickr. Some rights reserved.

Image by stevendepolo on Flickr. Some rights reserved.

Spundge has published a step-by-step guide on how to embed ‘notebooks’ – which are the places where users can collect content of interest – onto their publishing platforms, and effectively use it as a liveblog of coverage from events by adding content, such as tweets, to the notebook.

Also, here’s more on how journalists can use Spundge to search the web, keep track of areas of interest and collaborate with others on content production.

 

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#Tip: Remember these social media shortcuts

Image by Thinkstock

Image by Thinkstock

Social media is a necessary evil in journalism, whether it’s for publishing, sourcing, communicating or networking, and with time being an increasingly precious resource anything to speed up the process is well received.

These social media shortcuts from Quintly hit the nail on the head in that respect, acting as a cheat sheet for quick ways around Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Google+. Well worth scribbling on a post-it note and sticking to your monitor.

If you have a tip you would like to submit to us at Journalism.co.uk email us using this link.

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#Tip: Save tweets with a particular hashtag to Tweet Binder

June 27th, 2013 | No Comments | Posted by in Search, Top tips for journalists
http://www.flickr.com/photos/cogdog/7423881070/sizes/l/in/photolist-cj2kcu-dGWcZK-8vo5eZ-bJWDrV-dCMHXz-9L9AXq-7WRhk4-aeJu58-9WgRN1-84dYMj-dAmgma-bARqu1-dCriLh-8baeFe-dF2bTs-dCMHWi-dCriPJ-8ZpqWc-adgYJn-adjMWG-9PDxc9-9PDe1e-a6hBZy-btZXrS-8wSgi5-8KbwPt-btZR2y-bGUDoZ-btZQZ3-d7b233-7FANcA-d52gEm-d52DuL/

Image by cogdogblog on Flickr. Some rights reserved

Tweet Binder allows you to search for a hashtag and add that collection of tweets to a ‘binder’. You can then search for keywords within that list of tweets.

This could be a useful tool if you are following a key story via a hashtag.

The free tool also offers analytics so you can see contributors (people who tweeted with that hashtag) and the potential reach of the tweets.

In the example below I searched for the #editors13 hashtag, searched for keywords and looked at the analytics of the tweets.

tweet-binder

tweet binder2

Another search tip

Another way to search for keywords present in tweets mentioning a particular hashtag is to set up a column for that hashtag in TweetDeck and to use the filter option which you access by clicking on ‘edit’ at the top of the column.

If you do not see the filter option, you might need to update your version of TweetDeck.

tweetdeck

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#Tip: Take a look at engagement data for your own tweets

Image by shawncampbell on Flickr. Some rights reserved.

Image by shawncampbell on Flickr. Some rights reserved.

Keen to get a better understanding of how people are engaging with your social media activity, beyond spotting the odd retweet or favourite? Ever send a tweet out and wonder how many people clicked through to the relevant link? Well, as reported by The Next Web, users can now easily access these sorts of analytics via Twitter Ads. It is simple to do – as The Next Web outlines, and offers great insight into what happens after you send a tweet.

If you have a tip you would like to submit to us at Journalism.co.uk email us using this link.
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#Tip: Install these Twitter add-ons for easily quoting and bookmarking articles

June 10th, 2013 | No Comments | Posted by in Top tips for journalists

Although 140 characters is a concise and scannable method of presenting news and stories from a readers point of view, sometimes whittling down those words can be a painful and laborious process.

There are, however, a few pieces of software that can sweeten the pill, as Amit Agarwal details in this blog post over at Digital Inspiration.

If you have a tip you would like to submit to us at Journalism.co.uk email us using this link.

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#Tip: Three handy Twitter tools

An article by the Guardian last week sparked a discussion on Twitter about the difference between the numbers shown on a ‘tweet’ share count button and the number of retweets.

Retweets

Official Twitter RTs have been around since 2009. When a tweet is retweeted in this way Twitter does not treat it as a separate tweet so the RT does not have a separate URL. Twitter measures RTs by the number of times the original tweet was RTed.

Share count buttons

The share count buttons on a news story show the number of times the story URL has been tweeted out. It includes RTs as the they carry the URL. This number will therefore be greater than the number of RTs.

Example:

For example, this Journalism.co.uk story on 100 Twitter accounts every journalism student should follow received 131 RTs, according to My Top Tweets (see below).

The URL of the story was shared 1,735 times on Twitter, according to LinkTally (see below).

Three handy Twitter tools

Online tools for analysing your top tweets, the number of times and article has been shared and how many people your tweet has reached.

My Top Tweets

This shows the most RTed tweets from a particular Twitter account.

MyTopTweets

LinkTally

This measures how many times a URL has been shared. It shows share numbers for Twitter, Facebook, Google+ and LinkedIn.

LinkTally

TweetReach

This measures how many people each tweet reaches.

TweetReach

 

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#Tip: Pointers for growing your Twitter following

While it may not all be about quantity, journalists and news outlets alike are undoubtedly keen to grow a large, and engaged community on social networks with which to share and discuss their content. This how-to by David Beard on the Poynter Institute website runs through  a list of “eight ways to attract more Twitter followers” looking at both the content being tweeted as well as the way the tweet itself is constructed.

If you have a tip you would like to submit to us at Journalism.co.uk email us using this link.

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#Tip of the day for journalists: Use the Twitter phone app for alerts

Mobile-first

You may opt to use one of the third-party Twitter apps on your phone (such as Tweetbot or Neatly), but it is worth adding Twitter’s own app so you can use your phone as a second screen to keep an eye on any Twitter accounts you manage.

If you manage several Twitter accounts, adding all accounts to the app on your phone provides a really handy way of keeping an eye on activity. If you use a computer set up with a single screen, having the alerts display on your phone can be useful while working, plus it allows you to keep track at evenings and weekends.

Twitter-notification

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#Tip of the day for journalists: Add Twitter search to your browser

February 20th, 2013 | No Comments | Posted by in Search, Top tips for journalists
Image by shawncampbell on Flickr. Some rights reserved.

Image by shawncampbell on Flickr. Some rights reserved.

Today’s tip is to add a Twitter address bar search browser extension. That will mean you can search Twitter from the search bar at the top of your web browser.

The Firefox extension is at this link, or you can use the search dropdown to ‘manage search engines’ and access this search option and more.

Firefox Twitter

The Chrome extension is at this link. This extension adds a search bar to Chrome (which will appear as a magnifying glass logo), with Twitter as one of the options.

Chrome

 

You can carryout hashtag searches, user searches or enter Twitter advanced operators. For more on searching social media see this guide.

You might also like to add a Creative Commons Search option to Firefox, which was Monday’s tip of the day.

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#Tip of the day for journalists: Verifying Twitter content

Image by shawncampbell on Flickr. Some rights reserved.

Image by shawncampbell on Flickr. Some rights reserved.

Digital First Media’s digital transformation editor Steve Buttry has produced a detailed post outlining a series of techniques for verifying content on Twitter.

Last year, Journalism.co.uk also produced a how-to guide on verifying content shared on social media.

If you have a tip you would like to submit to us at Journalism.co.uk email us using this link.

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