Browse > Home /

#Tip of the day from Journalism.co.uk – try Google Correlate

December 8th, 2011 | No Comments | Posted by in Top tips for journalists

The 10,000 Words blog has named Google Correlate as it’s tool of the day.

Correlate allows you to find search patterns. You can upload your own data, enter a search query or select a time frame and get back a list of queries that follows a similar pattern to your search. You can also download the search results as a CSV file.

The 10,000 Words post, which acts as a handy guide to Correlate, is at this link.

Tipster: Sarah Marshall

If you have a tip you would like to submit to us at Journalism.co.uk email us using this link– we will pay a fiver for the best ones published.

 

Tags: , ,

Similar posts:

#Tip of the day from Journalism.co.uk – recording a better interview

December 6th, 2011 | No Comments | Posted by in Multimedia, Top tips for journalists

Video journalist Adam Westbrook has shared a presentation online with 10 tips for recording a better interview.

Written for students at Kingston University, the tips are aimed at broadcast journalists.

Tips include:

  • Know your character before starting your story
  • Ask warm up questions to make interviewees feel comfortable
  • Be enthusiastic – but silent
  • Ask double-barrelled questions

Westbrook’s 10 tips for recording a better video (or audio) interview are at this link.

Adam Westbrook will be presenting in a session on online video at news:rewired – media in motion on 3 February. The news:rewired agenda is here.

Tipster: Sarah Marshall

If you have a tip you would like to submit to us at Journalism.co.uk email us using this link– we will pay a fiver for the best ones published.

Tags: , ,

Similar posts:

#Tip of the day from Journalism.co.uk – try ScraperWiki’s new screencasts

December 5th, 2011 | 1 Comment | Posted by in Data, Top tips for journalists

Data journalists and anyone interested in the field should take a look at ScraperWiki’s new screencasts.

There’s a link to them on Nicola Hughes’ DataMinerUK blog.

Tipster: Sarah Marshall

If you have a tip you would like to submit to us at Journalism.co.uk email us using this link– we will pay a fiver for the best ones published.

Tags: , , ,

Similar posts:

#Tip of the day from Journalism.co.uk – use Transcribe for typing quotes from audio

If you record interviews and listen back to take quotes, there is a handy web app you should know about.

Transcribe is a free web app available in the Chrome web store that allows you to upload an mp3 or wav file and then type your text below.

It has two main benefits over listening back to an interview via another player. Firstly, it saves you toggling between an audio player or iTunes and your text document or CMS. It also has a nifty pause button that automatically plays from a second or two before the point at which you stopped the recording. It may not sound like a particularly ingenious tool but this is a really helpful feature.

The app also works offline, it automatically saves your text and it has short cuts to rewind, fast forward and pause.

Click this link for 10 free Chrome web apps that journalists should know about.

Tipster: Sarah Marshall

If you have a tip you would like to submit to us at Journalism.co.uk email us using this link– we will pay a fiver for the best ones published.

Tags: , , , , ,

Similar posts:

#Tip of the day from Journalism.co.uk – use iPiccy for preparing images for the web

If you usually crop, resize, fix and add borders to images using Photoshop, there is a free web app you should know about.

iPiccy is a web app available in the Chrome store that will help you perform basic image edits.

It will save you from launching Photoshop and is worth remembering when you find yourself working on a computer without an image editing application.

Click this link for 10 free Chrome web apps that journalists should know about.

Tipster: Sarah Marshall

If you have a tip you would like to submit to us at Journalism.co.uk email us using this link– we will pay a fiver for the best ones published.

Tags: , , ,

Similar posts:

#Tip of the day from Journalism.co.uk – working out when to liveblog rather than tweet

Poytner has a post to help you determine when liveblogging is more effective than tweeting.

Liveblogging is “still one of my favorite instruments in the modern journalism toolkit”, writes Matt Thompson, but fears its popularity is diminishing.

Thompson offers journalists five reasons why a story should be liveblogged rather than tweeted, saying a liveblog forces you to genuinely pay attention, it also forces you to write, it can be intensely engaging, it’s a service to your users and it can be a service from your users.

The full post with all these arguments explained is at this link.

Tipster: Sarah Marshall

If you have a tip you would like to submit to us at Journalism.co.uk email us using this link – we will pay a fiver for the best ones published.

Tags: , , ,

Similar posts:

#Tip of the day from Journalism.co.uk – Why Facebook comments are worth more than likes

A Facebook comment is worth more than a like, which is worth more than a click, according to Jeff Widman, co-founder of analytics tool PageLever.

The greater the engagement you have with your fans on Facebook, the more prominent position your content will be in their news feeds.

This is an important fact to understand if you are a journalist managing your news organisation’s Facebook page.

Speaking in this week’s Journalism.co.uk podcast on the best time and frequency for news organisations to post to Twitter and Facebook, Widman clearly explains how Facebook’s algorithm, EdgeRank, works.

Don’t just post like a status update. Post it in a way that tries to get people to comment or like. The reason you’re doing that is you’re trying to get people to take actions that explicitly show the algorithm that they are interested in your content.

Facebook is watching all the explicit actions the user takes. It is watching if a user comes and visits your fan page, it is watching if a user clicks on your content, it is watching if a user clicks like or shares. However, a comment is worth more than a like is worth more than a click.

If people are clicking your status updates that’s good, but you’re going to get a lot more glue (Facebook calls it affinity) between the user and the publisher if they’re leaving a comment.

Listen to this week’s podcast for or more tips on posting to Facebook.

Tipster: Sarah Marshall

If you have a tip you would like to submit to us at Journalism.co.uk email us using this link – we will pay a fiver for the best ones published.

Tags: , , , , ,

Similar posts:

#Tip of the day from Journalism.co.uk – use Bettween to track Twitter conversations

Bettween is a handy tool that allows you to view a conversation between two Twitter users.

Whether you are a journalist tracking a conversation or wanting to demonstrate an exchange, it is a site that is worth being aware of.

Tipster: Sarah Marshall

If you have a tip you would like to submit to us at Journalism.co.uk email us using this link – we will pay a fiver for the best ones published.

Tags: , , ,

Similar posts:

#Tip of the day from Journalism.co.uk – how to cross-post Google+ posts to a WordPress blog

Today’s tip explains how to cross-post your Google+ posts to your WordPress blog.

The Next Web tells you how you can do this using a WordPress plugin, Google+Blog.

The plugin lets you import your posts automatically to WordPress with next to no effort. Simply download and install the plugin, follow the instructions listed [in the article], and you’ll be able to share your Google+ posts with your blog followers who don’t have an account on the social networking site. There are two versions of the plugin – a paid and a free version, both of which you can download here.

The article guides you through installing the plugin.

Tipster: Sarah Marshall

If you have a tip you would like to submit to us at Journalism.co.uk email us using this link – we will pay a fiver for the best ones published.

Tags: , , , ,

Similar posts:

#Tip of the day from Journalism.co.uk – tools for beginner data journalists

October 10th, 2011 | No Comments | Posted by in Data, Top tips for journalists

Poynter has put together this collection of 10 types of tools which are likely to be of use to those just starting out in the field of data journalism, for each part of the process of telling stories in this way. The tools on Poynter’s list vary from the bog-standard spreadsheet to more advanced tools such as Google Refine for cleaning data or visualisation platforms such as Google Fusion Tables or Tableau Public. The list also looks at scripting language and mapping software.

See the full list here.

Tipster: Rachel McAthy

If you have a tip you would like to submit to us at Journalism.co.uk email us using this link – we will pay a fiver for the best ones published.

Tags: , , ,

Similar posts:

© Mousetrap Media Ltd. Theme: modified version of Statement