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BBC Radio 4 Today: The Drum explains decision to publish Prince Harry images online

August 24th, 2012 | No Comments | Posted by in Online Journalism

Following the Sun newspaper’s decision to print the nude images of Prince Harry today, despite a request from St James’s Palace lawyers earlier this week that they not be published, there has been widespread discussion in the media about the move.

Explaining its decision today, the Sun said “there is a clear public interest in publishing the Harry pictures, in order for the debate around them to be fully informed”.

The Sun adds that “it is absurd that in the internet age newspapers like the Sun could be stopped from publishing stories and pictures already seen by millions on the free-for-all that is the web”.

At the time of writing, the Guardian was reporting that more than 150 complaints have been made to the Press Complaints Commission, but not from the Palace’s lawyers.

A survey of 1000 UK adults today by Usurv who were asked about the Sun’s decision to publish the images, found 21 per cent agreed the photos were in the public interest, while 63 per cent did not agree with the decision.

On BBC Radio 4’s Today programme this morning, editor of marketing and media news site The Drum Gordon Young spoke about their decision to publish the images online alongside a column discussing the fact that British newspapers had not done so, at the time. The Today programme said The Drum had “claimed to be the first UK website” to publish the photos.

What’s very interesting is this was a very logical and easy decision for The Drum. We were surprised at the controversy relative to what an easy decision it was for us.

… It was such an obvious thing to do in the context of the column and the piece, the writer was basically criticising press for not having the backbone to release the pictures in the UK so we couldn’t run that and not had the backbone ourselves to do it.

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The Drum: Newspapers ‘could introduce football Twitter reporter role’

The Drum is reporting that national newspapers “could introduce football Twitter reporter role”. That’s according to Henry Winter, Daily Telegraph football correspondent and columnist for the Sunday Telegraph.

@henrywinter has more than 100,000 Twitter followers.

“I think each sports desk could have someone solely concentrating on Twitter,” Winter said. “They’d talk to the fans about what’s happening during the game and report on the match as it is happening.

“I did an experiment where I spent a whole match not writing a report for the paper but just talking to fans on Twitter. The response was incredible.”

Speaking at the MPA’s National Newspaper Debate in Manchester, Winter said the thousands of messages he receives online had begun to inform his reporting.

Winter goes on to discuss how Twitter brings him closer to his audience but warned of the dangers or entering disputes with readers.

The Drum’s full article is at this link.

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Round-up: Reaction to GMG Regionals sale to Trinity Mirror

February 10th, 2010 | No Comments | Posted by in Jobs, Newspapers

Trinity Mirror’s acquisition of Guardian Media Group’s regional businesses, including Manchester Evening News publisher MEN Media, and plans to relocate MEN Media staff to Oldham has stirred mass discussion amongst media commentators online. Below are links breaking down the fundamental aspects of the story:

The Guardian’s Steve Busfield covers the imminent MEN move, reporting claims by Carolyn McCall, the chief executive of Guardian Media Groups, that the £44.8m sale of GMG is in the best interests of GMG Regional Media.

Holdthefrontpage.co.uk has a statement from Bethan Dorsett, organiser of the NUJ chapel at MEN Media Weeklies, and Judith Gordon, director of the MEN chapel, describing their concerns for MEN staff.

The Drum covers the various reactions produced by the deal, questioning whether Trinity got a good deal or gained a dying media group, including comments from analyst Jim Chisholm, who told the Drum it was “a great deal for Trinity Mirror” though “not such a great reflection of the way the regional print industry is today viewed”.

On Press Gazette, the financial benefits of the deal to GMG and Trinity Mirror – pointing towards the FT’s analysis of the sale, which considers the issue of consolidation, but comes down in favour of TM saying it was a bargain for the group.

Crain’s Manchester business takes notice of the exclusion of Channel M in the GMG sale to Trinity Mirror. Channel M lost GMG a significant amount of money since it’s launch and its segregation has left questions being asked about the channels future.

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The Drum: ‘BNP begins complaint campaign aimed at MEN’s advertisers’

May 29th, 2009 | No Comments | Posted by in Editors' pick

“The BNP is encouraging its supporters to complain to the Manchester Evening News’ advertisers following the paper’s editorial stance urging readers not to vote for the party in next week’s European elections,” reports the Drum.

[If you're not registered, you'll need to do so first in order to read] Full story at this link…

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The Drum: Trinity Mirror to expand new production system to Scotland

October 15th, 2008 | No Comments | Posted by in Editors' pick, Journalism, Newspapers

The publisher may extend the new production system currently being introduced to its Midlands titles to its Scottish operations, which includes the Daily Record and Sunday Mail.

As part of the new procedure journalists upload their copy directly to a centralised content management system, before it is deployed to the online or print edition, The Drum reports.

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