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#Tip: See these stats on news site traffic from social media

Image by Thinkstock

Image by Thinkstock

The people at analytics platform Chartbeat have published a revealing study on social traffic to news sites.

I suggest you read the full post, but I am going to pull out a few key stats and points:

  • Overall, about 26 per cent of traffic we measure comes from social sources – Facebook, Twitter, and email, for example – making social the second most significant source of traffic.
  • Social sources are a better than average source of new visitors: while an average of 31 per cent of a site’s traffic comes from new visitors, an average of 41 per cent of social visitors are new.
  • Social traffic is also dramatically more mobile-based than all other traffic — an average of 25 per cent of traffic is on mobile, but on many sites over 40 per cent of social traffic is mobile.

There is a section of the post which addresses when to post to social (based on EST times). It is worth seeing the figures displayed in a graph in the post.

  • Social traffic substantially underperforms overall traffic from about 5am to noon, and social substantially overperforms overall traffic from about 3pm until 1am.

Twitter timing is also separated out:

  • Posting to Twitter is strong all morning and reaches its peak just before noon, even though traffic from social is actually its strongest later in the day.

The study also looks at return visitors:

  • About 82 per cent of visitors who come from social only come once, but there’s a long tail of people who come two or more times.

And as the post states, it is worth investing time in social:

Social is also categorically different than other sources of traffic because it’s the only channel that’s easily influenced — while converting visitors to come directly to your homepage is an art and affecting search engine placement leaves much to chance, we can actively choose which articles we put on social media and when to provide those links.

 

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#Tip: Check out interesting news app study findings

August 9th, 2013 | No Comments | Posted by in Mobile, Top tips for journalists

Mobile-first

Pandodaily has reported on a study by Localytics which offers some interesting findings on apps, which may be of interest to news publishers working on launching mobile and/or tablet apps.

Key findings from the study, according to Pandodaily’s report, include:

  • That time spent with news apps on tablet devices said to be “50 times” higher than mobiles
  • That “80 percent of content shares from apps happen by email”
  • And that the amount of time spent with apps is said to have fallen 26 per cent
If you have a tip you would like to submit to us at Journalism.co.uk email us using this link.

 

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Study: Fewer UK journalists feel social media improves productivity in 2012 than in 2011

September 19th, 2012 | No Comments | Posted by in Social media and blogging

Image by Adikos on Flickr. Some rights reserved.

An annual study into how UK journalists feel social media impacts on their work was announced this week by Canterbury Christ Church University and public relations and media services outlet Cision.

The report’s findings are based on 769 responses from UK journalists. According to a release from the university the study found an “increasing number of concerns about productivity, privacy and the future of journalism”.

For example, the number of journalists who said they felt social media improved their productivity fell from 49 per cent in 2011 to 39 per cent in 2012.

At the same time, the percentage of those who disagreed that social media improved productivity increased from 20 per cent to 34 per cent. Journalists were also less positive this year about the impact of social media on their relationships with their audience.

In general, they think that social media allows greater engagement with their audience, but the number who strongly agreed with that sentiment dropped from 43 per cent to 27 per cent.

The study can be downloaded from Cision. For more on the findings see this report by the Drum.

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