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#Tip: Remember how to spot and defend against cyber attacks

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As this Scribd story by Jonathan Stray tells us, “journalism is a high risk professions”.

“Even if you’re not working on a sensitive story,” says the assistant adjunct professor at Columbia Journalism School, “you are a target.”

Threat Modeling: Planning digital security for your story‘ is an important document for journalists everywhere in recognising and protecting themselves against from hacking attempts and learning to protect documents that could incriminate sources. As well as highlighting instances when the AP and Washington Post were successfully hacked, Stray gives case studies, exercises and resources that help journalists understand security better.

You may just be working on a feature about cupcakes, but if only one journalist at a news organisation is working on a sensitive story then the whole organisation becomes a target. At the very least, this could lead to the story getting blown but it could also mean a source gets arrested or, worse still, killed.

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#Podcast: How 2 publishers approach YouTube for online video

November 1st, 2013 | No Comments | Posted by in Broadcasting, Podcast

YouTube is officially the largest video-hosting platform in the world. It claims a billion unique users each month watch six billion hours of footage, a total up 50 per cent on last year. The audience and demand for online video is vast and, with 100 hours of video uploaded every minute, there is more and more choice and competition.

So how can publishers take advantage of this platform? In this podcast, we speak to two video producers about what has worked for them in making their YouTube channels a success.

We speak to:

  • Al Brown, head of video, Vice UK
  • David Boddington, head of video production, games and film, Future Publishing

You can hear future podcasts by signing up to the Journalism.co.uk podcast feed on iTunes.

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#Tip: Advice on ethics and best practice in data journalism

September 27th, 2013 | No Comments | Posted by in Data, Top tips for journalists

As a still emerging field, data journalism throws up a number of practical and ethical pitfalls that have no real precedent in the industry.

Paul Bradshaw, who runs an MA in online journalism at Birmingham University and is a visiting Professor at city University London, has been publishing a series of articles through his Online Journalism Blog this week that seek to define some elements of best practice when it comes working with online data sources.

Privacy, protection of sources, automation and more are covered as part of a “draft book chapter on ethics in data journalism” Bradshaw is producing. Well worth remembering for established data journalists or those just starting out.

If you have a tip you would like to submit to us at Journalism.co.uk email us using this link.
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#Tip: Check out this reading list of online journalism resources

September 24th, 2013 | No Comments | Posted by in Top tips for journalists

A little healthy reading on the weekend or commute around your chosen field is always beneficial. As such, Paul Bradshaw who has put together a reading list of books on online journalism for his students that it is well worth taking a look at, whether you’re just starting out or been in the industry for years.

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#Tip: Learn how to encrypt your emails

August 27th, 2013 | No Comments | Posted by in Top tips for journalists

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Our emails are not nearly as secure as we would like to believe. This had been suspected by many before the recent and continuing revelations from Edward Snowden, Glenn Greenwald, Alan Rusbridger et al. but it should now be common knowledge that every email we send can be viewed by third parties and security services.

So Alan Henry has put together a guide over at Lifehacker on how, with a little time and patience, you can learn to encrypt your emails. This is obviously not necessary for any kind of “Hi Mum” or “look at this cat” type of correspondence but having the relevant know-how could be vital if a source reaches out and wants to share encrypted information with you. Besides, Glenn Greenwald almost lost the NSA story because he ignored Snowden’s instructions on how to encrypt their communication.

If you have a tip you would like to submit to us at Journalism.co.uk email us using this link.
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#Tip: Learn how to make YouTube work for you

By dominicotine on Flickr. Some rights reserved.

By dominicotine on Flickr. Some rights reserved.

The role of video in online journalism is becoming increasingly important and, aside from the basics of filming and editing, there are other ways to make video content more effective online.

YouTube channels can be a successful way to find and engage with an audience, whether for your blog, magazine or news outlet, and at their free-to-join Creator Academy there are lessons on using YouTube to the full. The current course, on how to “maximise your channel”, comprises six lessons on a “self-paced” format.

If you have a tip you would like to submit to us at Journalism.co.uk email us using this link.
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#Tip: Lessons in successfully switching from print to digital

May 28th, 2013 | No Comments | Posted by in Top tips for journalists
Image by Adikos on Flickr. Some rights reserved.

Image by Adikos on Flickr. Some rights reserved.

More and more publications are making the jump from print to digital and digital-first has become a mantra for a number of organisations, from international media houses to hyperlocal magazines. Here are some lessons learned by a college newspaper on making that switch.

If you have a tip you would like to submit to us at Journalism.co.uk email us using this link.

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#Tip: 10 online tools for reporting, storytelling and engagement

May 2nd, 2013 | No Comments | Posted by in Top tips for journalists

Poynter have drawn up a list of 10 need-to-know tools for journalists, handily compiled into categories as research, social media and data tools.

The first tool, FOIA Machine, is an American project that is still sourcing contacts so UK users may wish to use What Do They Know as an alternative.

If you have a tip you would like to submit to us at Journalism.co.uk email us using this link.

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#Tip: Videonotes can streamline online research

April 18th, 2013 | No Comments | Posted by in Top tips for journalists

Keeping track of notes when researching a story can sometimes be a struggle, especially when they refer to online resources. Videonotes (not to be confused with VideoNote) can help to ease the process by letting you tag notes to any video from around the internet, as this article from The Next Web explains.

If you have a tip you would like to submit to us at Journalism.co.uk email us using this link.

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How to respond to consultation on website operators clause of draft defamation bill

January 8th, 2013 | No Comments | Posted by in Legal
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Image by alancleaver_2000 on Flickr. Some rights reserved.

An informal consultation on the section of the draft defamation bill that covers “operators of websites” has been launched to gather feedback.

According to The International Forum for Responsible Media Blog, the consultation relates to clause 5 of the bill which intends to “provide a new defence for website operators in circumstances where the claimant can pursue his claim for defamation against the person who posted the statement”.

The consultation, being run by the Ministry of Justice, will close on Thursday 31 January (the deadline has been extended).

Those who wish to respond can do so by emailing defamation@justice.gsi.gov.uk for more information.

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