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Guardian gives readers option to ‘hide Olympics’ section on homepage

July 26th, 2012 | No Comments | Posted by in Online Journalism

The Guardian is offering its readers the option of hiding the part of its homepage dedicated to the majority of its Olympics coverage, in a move similar to that which it took during the Royal Wedding last year.

Back in April 2011 the Guardian also featured a button on its homepage to remove Royal Wedding related coverage.

And this feature is something that has been seen elsewhere during big news events. The website for Norwegian newspaper Dagbladet gave its readers the choice of a “Breivik-free” version during the trial of Anders Behring Breivik.

And just like the Guardian, Norwegian title, Verdens Gang, also offered a button for users to remove Royal Wedding coverage last year.

Hatip: @TheMediaTweets and @hayjane

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MSN UK study release: Quarter of respondents ‘overwhelmed by the volume of news each day’

MSN UK recently commissioned a survey of 2,000 people (carried out by OnePoll) which looks at audience behaviour in certain news situations, as part of its Best of Now marketing campaign.

The findings including looking at the sources people turn to for breaking news coverage. This found that the majority (40 per cent) of respondents (who were able to select more than one answer), chose online news sites as their source. This was followed by newspapers with 30 per cent and social media with 20 per cent of respondents.

The survey also asked what news sources were most trusted by respondents, which saw broadcast television and radio come top with 43 per cent, followed by online news sites with 19 per cent, newspapers with 15 per cent and magazines with 9.1 per cent. Social networks were named as most trusted by just under five per cent.

A quarter of respondents highlighted in the survey that they can be “overwhelmed by the volume of news each day and demand quality, not quantity”, according to a press release. And when it comes to time spent consuming news, with the survey finding that on average 10 years ago respondents felt they would spend around 10 minutes a day consuming news, compared to an average of 15 minutes today.

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#GEN2012: Startup projects showcased in new contest

May 31st, 2012 | No Comments | Posted by in Events

The Global Editors Network launched a new contest at the News World Summit in Paris today, which has seen a number of new startups already outline their service or product to delegates, who will then vote on what they have seen.

The Startups for News competition saw more than 50 startups enter, with 13 selected who will present to the conference over today and tomorrow.

Speaking to the conference, GEN’s deputy director Antoine Laurent said there was “a need for more contact and more communication between media groups, editors-in-chief and smaller companies, startups offering editorial services”.

The 13 selected startups are mostly French outlets, but there are also four others from other parts of the world.

The winner will be declared on Friday.

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#GEN2012: Follow the Global Editors Network News World Summit in Paris

May 30th, 2012 | No Comments | Posted by in Events, Online Journalism

For the rest of the week Journalism.co.uk will be reporting from the Global Editors Network’s News World Summit in Paris.

The three-day event will is following the mantra of “Converge. Hack. Innovate.” As GEN says:

This is the strategy that newsroom executives everywhere need to follow to drive their organisations successfully through a cross-platform media world. This is the strategy that the News World Summit (NEWS!) will define through sessions, debates, and workshops.

We will be reporting on Journalism.co.uk and tweeting live via @journalism_live and @journalismnews where you can follow events with the #GEN2012 hashtag.

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#jpod – News industry approaches to curation and aggregation

Image by art makes me smile on Flickr. Some rights reserved.

This week’s jpod looks at how different publishing platforms in the news industry are approaching curation and aggregation of news, from sources across the web including news outlets, bloggers and social media platforms.

Journalism.co.uk’s news editor Rachel McAthy speaks to:

In the spirit of curation, here is a list of some related reading and resources on this topic:

You can hear future podcasts by signing up to the Journalism.co.uk iTunes podcast feed.

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The top 10 most-read stories on Journalism.co.uk, 31 March – 5 April

April 5th, 2012 | No Comments | Posted by in Journalism, Online Journalism

1. How to: verify content from social media

2. Ten ideas for news outlets using Pinterest

3. Archie Bland to be youngest Independent deputy editor

4. App of the week for journalists: SkyRecorder, for recording Skype calls on iPhone/iPad

5. Students to launch liveblogging platform Ocqur

6. Bloggers lose $105m pay claim against Huffington Post

7. Rebekah Brooks reapplies for Leveson core participant status

8. Veteran broadcaster and Media Society chairman David Walter dies

9. Future Publishing launches iPad-only title as second screen to computer

10. Police refer ‘Gypsy’ headline case to CPS

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The top 10 most-read stories on Journalism.co.uk, 10-16 March

March 16th, 2012 | No Comments | Posted by in Journalism, Online Journalism

1. Al Jazeera to broadcast Syria documentary filmed entirely on iPhone

2. BBC: ‘sophisticated cyber-attack’ on London newsroom

3. Ebooks: a new publishing solution to an old business problem?

4. Rebekah Brooks among latest Operation Weeting arrests, reports say

5. Citizen journalism, cyber censorship and the Arab spring

6. Guardian reporter: Police communication being ‘closed down’

7. Shareholders concerned about Sly Bailey pay

8. ‘Cities expect more from newspapers that are ‘local’ in name only’

9. Former NoW reporter: ‘I was instructed to bribe police officers’

10. Syrian citizen journalists win Netizen prize

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Entries now open for 2012 Online Media Awards

February 13th, 2012 | No Comments | Posted by in Awards, Journalism, Online Journalism

Entries are now open for this year’s Online Media Awards, which set out to recognise the best digital news work from online operators big and small.

There are 17 categories covering everything from writing and editing to photography, design and use of social media. The entry deadline for the awards, now in their second year, is 23 March. The finalists will be announced mid-April and the winners at the awards ceremony in London in June.

Last year’s big winner was the Sunday Times website, which won six awards including best video journalism, best campaigning or investigative journalism, best use of photography, plus the grand prix. The site’s editor, Gordon Thomson, was named online editor of the year.

To find out more, see http://www.onlinemediaawards.net/

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Independent backs Paul Dacre’s press card proposal

February 7th, 2012 | No Comments | Posted by in Journalism, Newspapers, Online Journalism

Paul Dacre giving evidence to the Leveson inquiry yesterday

The Independent has supported Daily Mail editor Paul Dacre’s suggestion to create a register of accredited journalists and toughen up access to the press card.

In a leader article today, the paper agreed that the “kitemark” system had potential, claiming: “Some information sources are more reliable than others.”

Mr Dacre was right that the idea that journalists should be licensed by the state is repellent to the fundamentals of press freedom. But there is merit in his suggestion for a body replacing, or sitting alongside, the existing Press Complaints Commission, which would be charged with the wider upholding of media standards.

One of its functions might be the issuing of a press card which could be suspended or withdrawn from individuals who gravely breach those standards. And while some people will argue that a kitemark for professional journalism might threaten freedom of expression in an age when much news and comment originates with bloggers and social networks, there is no danger to that freedom in giving the public what might be called a quality reassurance. Some information sources are more reliable than others.

Dacre admitted yesterday that he hadn’t given much thought to whether digital journalists would be eligible for the scheme.

The Guardian’s Dan Sabbagh says Dacre’s proposal risks pushing bloggers “right to the fringes of the system

Meanwhile, where would foreign media, with their own rules, fit in? Nor is it certain that a Dacrecard system would be effective. Whilst some of the reporting closed shops, most obviously the political lobby, confer benefits, being outside it does not hamper quality political journalism. It could be surprisingly easy to make a mockery of the Dacrecard system.

TheMediaBlog agrees:

This self-serving suggestion is a clear attempt to ostracise whole swathes of the predominantly online media industry who would eat Dacre’s lunch given half the chance.

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Jon Snow’s Cudlipp lecture: ‘Twitter leads the information thirsty to water’

January 24th, 2012 | No Comments | Posted by in Editors' pick, Events, Journalism

Toni Knevitt, London College of Communication

Channel 4 News presenter Jon Snow gave the annual Hugh Cudlipp lecture last night, in which he gave a powerful speech on what he views as the advent of “journalism’s golden age”.

Snow has published the full version of his speech on his Snowblog, but here are some highlights from the lecture.

Much of his speech discussed how new technology and real-time news across platforms has an impact on the work of journalists:

Contrast therefore my first reporting from Uganda in 1976 and my most recent foreign assignment in 2011.

That first report on the ground in Uganda dealt with the horror of Amin, it was graphic, and because I was not constrained by immediate “live” deadlines and the rest, I had time to hang about to try to grab an interview with the tyrant: that’s the upside. But I had little mechanism for developing any sense of how the story connected with the outside world – the UN, Westminster and the rest.

… Contrast that with my last major foreign assignment in Cairo’s Tahrir Square where I tweeted, blogged, reported, fed the bird, and then anchored that night’s Channel 4 News live from just outside the Square. Mind you, with the pressures of time, some of the fun has gone out of it all.

For journalists, he said, the “liberation” of the media gives way to a new “golden age of journalism”:

We are in the age of answer back, better still we are in the age in which “we the people” have their greatest opportunity ever to influence the information agenda … But above all we are in the age of more. More potential to get it right, to get it fast, to get it in depth. We have that illusive entity “the level playing field”, we can compete on equal terms and yet be the best.

He also passed comment on some of the biggest issues facing the news industry today, from regulation to the phone hacking scandal:

I think it is absolutely right that there is a regulator that people can go to. Who are we to be above the opportunity for people to review what we’ve done? Furthermore I do not want to find my own editors somewhere in the mix. I want an objective regulator.

… Of course, papers and TV are entirely different beasts, and they work in entirely different ways, but I see no reason why print journalism wouldn’t benefit from a credible regulator in the same way TV has.

And not forgetting the Leveson inquiry, which is currently looking at the culture and ethics of the press:

Leveson should recommend many of the people and institutions that have been before him find a way of allowing their staff to get stuck into the real world, it will vastly improve and deepen their journalism. We journalists are not a breed a part – we must be of the world we report. The hacking scandal reveals an echelon of hacks who removed themselves from the world in which the rest of us live – they took some weird pleasure in urinating on our world.

But finally, he called for journalists to be given more time and space wherever possible:

The speed and pace of what all of us is doing is starving, television journalists in particular, of the opportunity to develop the stature and presence of our forebears.

These were people who had days in which to prepare their stories, dominated a tiny handful of channels, and became iconic figures in the medium. It is much, much harder for journalists today to ascend the same ladder and preside with their kind of authority and we need to afford talent the time, the space and the working experience to develop the authority that our medium depends upon.

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