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#Tip: Test your online journalism law

November 20th, 2013 | No Comments | Posted by in Top tips for journalists, Training
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Image by Alex France on Flickr. Some rights reserved

Every day this week Paul Bradshaw is posting a legal dilemma on the Online Journalism Blog to allow students to test their online journalism law knowledge.

The test may be aimed at students but is a useful exercise for all journalists.

Bradshaw will be live tweeting a discussing on Friday between 10am and noon (UK time), using the #ojblaw.

Need an online media law refresher? We will be running a one-day course in February. The date is not yet fixed but email Sophie Green if you would like to receive details when available.

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#Tip: Different ways to curate content online

October 2nd, 2013 | 2 Comments | Posted by in Top tips for journalists

Journalism academic Paul Bradshaw has written a detailed post on curation, for those who want to do more to collect content from across the web in effective ways. The post features helpful examples of the variety of curation styles journalists can apply across the web, as well as key tools to use and some useful industry examples.

If you have a tip you would like to submit to us at Journalism.co.uk email us using this link.

 

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#Tip: Advice on improving process of data journalism

September 10th, 2013 | No Comments | Posted by in Data, Top tips for journalists
numbersdata Flickr Dave Bleasdale

Image by DaveBleasdale on Flickr. Some rights reserved.

On his Online Journalism Blog, journalism academic Paul Bradshaw is part-way through a collection of five tips on how to make the process, or “workflow” of data journalism more efficient. His advice includes ways to help find data in the first place, such as by creating “data newswires”, and using bookmarking to keep track of useful material. Bradshaw published his third tip today, looking at how to “anticipate problems”.

If you have a tip you would like to submit to us at Journalism.co.uk email us using this link.
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#Tip of the day for journalists: Legal refresh for journalists, with digital in mind

November 23rd, 2012 | No Comments | Posted by in Legal, Top tips for journalists

Image by Wiertz Sebastien on Flickr. Some rights reserved.

In a post on his Online Journalism Blog, Paul Bradshaw runs through seven laws – beyond libel, privacy, contempt – which may not be the first which spring to mind for journalists, but are important to know, such as when it comes to digital publishing. These include issues such as copyright, data protection, freedom of information and discrimination and hate speech legislation.

See his full post for more detail on the impacts of each of these laws.

If you have a tip you would like to submit to us at Journalism.co.uk email us using this link.

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#Tip of the day from Journalism.co.uk – how to get started as a multimedia journalist

August 30th, 2012 | No Comments | Posted by in Top tips for journalists

On the Online Journalism Blog, Paul Bradshaw has posted advice for anyone thinking of getting into multimedia journalism.

It is worth reading the full post, which includes tips on tutorials such as:

There are thousands of resources online to get you started, from Vimeo’s Video School and YouTube’s Playbook to the BBC College’s resources and Mindy McAdams’s collection on audio and video production.

YouTube has tons of tutorials on pretty much any skill you might want to tackle, but there are also text resources such as The Society of Professional Journalists’ Digital Media Handbook Part 1 (PDF) and Part 2 which cover mapping and data visualisation, among other useful techniques, and the Knight Digital Media Center’s extensive tutorials.

For photography there’s this free book on DSLR Cinematography, while videographers can choose between this ebook (PDF) by Adam Westbrook on multimedia production and ImageJunkies’s free ebook on news and documentary filmmaking.

Paul Bradshaw and Adam Westbrook are among the trainers leading one-day training courses in multimedia journalism skills for Journalism.co.uk. Find out about our short courses at this link.

If you have a tip you would like to submit to us at Journalism.co.uk email us using this link.

 

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#Tip of the day from Journalism.co.uk – interactive map tutorial for local election coverage

May 3rd, 2012 | No Comments | Posted by in Data, Online Journalism

Any journalists reporting on the local elections may like to try out this interactive Google map tutorial for visualising council ward boundaries, on the Online Journalism Blog. The guide to creating a ward map was created by journalist Daniel Bentley.

Tipster: Rachel McAthy

If you have a tip you would like to submit to us at Journalism.co.uk email us using this link– we will pay a fiver for the best ones published.

 

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#Tip of the day from Journalism.co.uk – nine new data tools

August 31st, 2011 | No Comments | Posted by in Top tips for journalists

On his Online Journalism Blog Paul Bradshaw rounds-up some of the latest data-related tools to crop up in recent months. His useful list includes data scraper Junar, data sharing platform BuzzData and data finder DataMarket.

Tipster: Rachel McAthy

If you have a tip you would like to submit to us at Journalism.co.uk email us using this link – we will pay a fiver for the best ones published.

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#Tip of the day from Journalism.co.uk – 10 lessons in community strategies

July 27th, 2011 | No Comments | Posted by in Top tips for journalists

From running a hyperlocal blog to a major national news site, actively building and maintaining communities around content is becoming increasingly important.

Paul Bradshaw’s Online Journalism Blog has 10 tips for those looking to do so, covering sustainability, analytics, the importance of real-world events, and more.

See the full list at this link.

Tipster: Joel Gunter

If you have a tip you would like to submit to us at Journalism.co.uk email us using this link – we will pay a fiver for the best ones published.

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#Tip of the day from Journalism.co.uk – How to add a Delicious feed to a spreadsheet

The Online Journalism Blog explains how to collaborate (or crowdsource) by combining Delicious and Google Docs.

In a Google Docs spreadsheet the formula =importfeed will pull information from an RSS feed and put it into that spreadsheet. Titles, links, datestamps and other parts of the feed will each be separated into their own columns.

When combined with Delicious, this can be a useful way to collect together pages that have been bookmarked by a group of people, or any other feed that you want to analyse.

You can follow the step-by-step guide by going to this link.

Tipster: Sarah Marshall

If you have a tip you would like to submit to us at Journalism.co.uk email us using this link – we will pay a fiver for the best ones published.

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Facebook lessons: from Paul Bradshaw and PageLever

Yesterday Paul Bradshaw shared his experience of running a blog entirely through a Facebook Page for four weeks, offering his thoughts on the month-long project in a post back on his Online Journalism Blog.

In the early days of the experiment he had already started noticing the pros and cons of the platform, from the impact of the 400 character limit on what he could write, to the possibilities presented by being able to post from a mobile phone via email.

So a month later here are his main reflections:

  • Facebook suits emotive material

The most popular posts during that month were simple links that dealt with controversy.

  • It requires more effort than most blogs

With most blogging it’s quite easy to ‘just do it’ and then figure out the bells and whistles later. With a Facebook Page I think a bit of preparation goes a long way – especially to avoid problems later on.

  • It isn’t suited to anything you might intend to find later

Although Vadim Lavrusik pointed out that you can find the Facebook Page through Google or Facebook’s own search, individual posts are rather more difficult to track down. The lack of tags and categories also makes it difficult to retrieve updates and notes – and highlights the problems for search engine optimisation.

  • It should be part of a network strategy

So, in short, while it’s great for short-term traffic, it’s bad for traffic long term. It’s better for ongoing work and linking than for more finished articles.

And his overall conclusion: Facebook should be used as “one more step in a distributed strategy” not in isolation.

Usefully in his post he offers a list of apps he used to integrate his Facebook content with his other online presences, which might a good reference point for others looking to use Facebook in a similar way:

  • RSS Graffiti (for auto-posting RSS feeds from elsewhere)
  • SlideShare (adds a new tab for your presentations on that site)
  • Cueler YouTube (pulls new updates from your YouTube account)
  • Tweets to Pages (pulls from your Twitter account into a new tab)
  • There’s also Smart Twitter for Pages which publishes page updates to Twitter; or you can use Facebook’s own Twitter page to link pages to Twitter.

There was also some interesting research published this month which looked at Facebook fan pages and engagement. According to the 10,000 Words blog a study was carried out by Facebook research company PageLever which suggested that as a fan page’s membership grows, engagement and page-views-per-member actually decreases.

From a purely aesthetic perspective, looking at the Fan Page and seeing that 10,000 people like your business on Facebook has its benefits. It makes you feel good.

But when it comes time to talk value, it can be a bit more difficult to find the silver lining. You might have 1,000 Likes on Facebook, but if you’re averaging around five Likes or comments per post, then only 0.005 per cent of your users saw the post and cared enough about it to respond.

Read more here…

Related content:

‘Readers may have the last say in what is and is not journalism’

How to: liveblog – lessons from news sites

#bbcsms: Al Jazeera developing new media tutorials for citizens

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