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Nieman Journalism Lab: Why the NYT was wrong to keep quiet about Rohde’s kidnap

Matthew Ingram believes the cover-up of David Rohde’s kidnap made ‘things harder not just for future kidnapping victims such as Rohde, but for newspapers and other mainstream media outlets as a whole.’

Ingram responds to criticism in the comments below the post.

Full post at this link…

Also see: NYTimes.com: ‘Keeping News of Kidnapping Off Wikipedia’

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Nieman Journalism Lab: Matthew Ingram on the WSJ’s social media policy

The Wall Street Journal’s rules of conduct were zipping around yesterday, inspiring comments from Jeff Jarvis, and others. Matthew Ingram, over at the Nieman Journalism Lab, agrees with Jarvis that the restrictions are too tight.

“Obviously, a newspaper doesn’t want to give away the store and tell everyone what stories it is working on, or tip its hand in a variety of other ways, and probably doesn’t want to go into detail about how certain stories emerged (especially if it was a fortuitous accident). But Jarvis is right that talking about stories that are under way can also have tremendous benefits,” Ingram writes.

Full post at this link…

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Matthew Ingram: ‘One person’s curation is another person’s scraping’

April 23rd, 2009 | No Comments | Posted by in Editors' pick, Online Journalism

Matthew Ingram examines the problems of paid-for aggregation for the Nieman Journalism Lab, using All Things Digital as a specific example.

“Curation has become a popular term in media circles, in the sense of a human editor who filters and selects content, and then packages it and delivers it to readers in some way. Many people (including me) believe that, in an era when information sources are exploding online, aggregation and curation of some kind is about the only service left that people might be willing to pay for.”

Full story at this link…

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Twitter workshop for journalists shared – courtesy of Globe & Mail’s Matthew Ingram

That’s the spirit! The slides from a Twitter workshop for journalists are shared online at this link, and also embedded below.

Matthew Ingram, communities editor at the Toronto-based Globe and Mail newspaper, ran a training session for his colleagues recently on how to get the most out of Twitter. He writes on his blog:

“I tried to make a number of points in the workshop, among them that Twitter is extremely simple to use (so why not give it a shot); that yes, it has a silly name, but that doesn’t mean it can’t be useful or valuable (Google had a silly name at one point too); that it is a great way of a) reaching out to and connecting with users, b) promoting our stories and c) finding sources for stories (otherwise known as ‘real people’); and that there are a number of tools that can make it even more useful (Tweetdeck, etc.).”

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Guardian’s Open Platform – some thoughts from the blogs

Not everyone is shouting from the rooftops about the Guardian’s release of content through an API, but on the whole the blog posts have been positive about the Open Platform launch:

Any other good posts or thoughts you’ve spotted?

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Mathew Ingram: A list of posts about micropayments for news

February 11th, 2009 | No Comments | Posted by in Editors' pick, Newspapers

If you can bear it, a list of links to key recent articles covering the debate about whether micropayments could save the newspaper industry.

Full blog post at this link…

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Nieman Journalism Lab: Globe and Mail on setting up a news wiki

Matthew Ingram, communities editor at the Globe and Mail in Canada, discusses the highs and lows of setting up a Public Policy Wiki on the paper’s website.

Full story at this link…

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GigaOm: WSJ ‘failed the Web 2.0 test’ with Google story

December 18th, 2008 | 1 Comment | Posted by in Editors' pick, Online Journalism

The WSJ’s reaction to Google’s response to its article about the search giant’s ‘net neutrality’ position was an ‘old-media approach’, writes Matthew Ingram.

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While we were away… EveryBlock, LoudounExtra, BBC plans and more

June 9th, 2008 | No Comments | Posted by in Journalism, Magazines

In case you hadn’t noticed, Journalism.co.uk was in Sweden last week covering the World Association of Newspapers annual conference and the World Editors Forum.

So no one misses out, here’s a round-up of what went down while we were away:

Guardian: BBC ends ‘licence fee’ plans for international news website
The Beeb has dropped proposals for subscription-based access to BBC.com

WSJ.com: Analysis of hyperlocal news site LoudounExtra.com
Following the departure of Rob Curley, chief architect behind the Washington Post spin-off site, WSJ asks if the site has found its audience a year into the project.

Editor&Publisher: 94 newspapers join Yahoo partnership
A total of 779 newspapers now have access to the search engine’s advertising technology and HotJobs ads.

Daily Mail: Sir Ian Blair advocates use of celebrity news videos as evidence in drug trials
Footage, such as the Sun’s infamous Amy Winehouse video and of Kate Moss snorting a white substance, should be presented to the jury in such cases, Blair has said.

Guardian: BBC’s new plans for personalisation of website
Plans to create a new rating, recommendation and personalisation system across bbc.co.uk will be put to the BBC Trust, according to the corporation’s latest programme policy statement.

Editor’s Weblog: Washington Post launches online publishing company
The Slate Group will feature a host of digital titles including Slate and The Root, with additional launches planned.

Telegraph.co.uk: Update on revamp of community blogging platform MyTelegraph
Communities editor Shane Richmond says a relaunch date will be announced by the end of next week.

Matthew Ingram: Globe and Mail removes pay wall
Number of subscribers was not enough to maintain the wall, says Ingram, who works for the paper. Some readers remain unconvinced, he says, pointing out one comment: “You can’t shut us out for a few years and then expect us to come back just because it’s free.”

MediaShift: Everyblock releases first special report
The hyperlocal data and news site has mapped information from a recent Chicago police bribery investigation as part of its first special report.

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