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#Tip: How often should you be posting to social media?

Image by shawncampbell on Flickr. Some rights reserved.

Image by shawncampbell on Flickr. Some rights reserved.

Social media might be a great tool for communication, but we all know someone who is a chronic over-sharer.

There’s nothing worse than having your timelines full of someone else’s verbal diarrhoea (and if the person in question is you, it’s a sure-fire way to get yourself unfollowed).

So how many times should you be posting to Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and Google+?

This post on the Buffer blog highlights the importance of striking “the balance between informative and annoying”.

While it doesn’t exactly deliver a cut-and-dried answer, it does offer recommendations from a range of sources – including Buffer’s own strategy for social sharing.

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#Tip: Advice for journalists using LinkedIn

Image by Nan Palmero on Flickr. Some rights reserved.

Image by Nan Palmero on Flickr. Some rights reserved.

At our news:rewired conference in September we ran an entire session dedicated to LinkedIn, and focused on how journalists can use the platform to engage with the online community. A write-up of some of the tips shared during the workshop can be found on the event website.

Last week, the blog for the International Journalists’ Network published further advice on “how journalists can conduct more effective searches” using the platform. The collection of pointers came out of a Q&A with Yumi Wilson, corporate communications manager at LinkedIn.

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#Tip: Try creating a CV infographic based on your LinkedIn profile

December 12th, 2012 | No Comments | Posted by in Freelance, Top tips for journalists

Visual.ly, an infographics, tool that we have written about regularly on Journalism.co.uk, has just released a new tool that allows you to create an infographic of your CV based on your LinkedIn profile.

There are five designs to choose from.

The personalised infographic can be embedded, downloaded or linked to.

Visual.ly has teamed up with Kelly Services to create the tool.

You can build an infographic based on your LinkedIn profile in seconds by following this link.

Related: 

Five free portfolio and profile platforms for journalists

Portfolio site for journalists launches

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#Tip of the day for journalists: making more of LinkedIn

Mashable has a post featuring five tips for journalists, from LinkedIn’s senior manager for corporate communications Krista Canfield, on not making “mistakes” on LinkedIn which may hinder their ability to use the platform to find stories as well as work.

See the full post here.

Earlier this year Journalism.co.uk produced a list of LinkedIn tips which may also offer some useful pointers.

If you have a tip you would like to submit to us at Journalism.co.uk email us using this link.

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#Tip of the day from Journalism.co.uk – LinkedIn advice for freelancers

June 20th, 2012 | No Comments | Posted by in Top tips for journalists

The LinkedIn blog has some tips for freelancers on making the most of the social network.

The post encourages “solopreneurs” (LinkedIn’s term, not ours) to: “show your stuff”; “get others to vouch for you”; and to network.

The post, which details each point, is at this link.

Tipster: Sarah Marshall

If you have a tip you would like to submit to us at Journalism.co.uk email us using this link.

 

 

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Tool of the week for journalists: Muck Rack

Tool of the week: Muck Rack

What is it? A site that aggregates Twitter and social media feeds for thousands of professional journalists.

How is it of use to journalists? Journalists often break or share vital information first through social media. Muck Rack allows you to monitor trending topics among journalists in real-time. Its aim, according to Muck Rack’s creators, is to deliver “tomorrow’s newspaper to you today”.

Launched in 2009, Muck Rack now draws content from thousands of journalists who use Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and other sources to break news on a daily basis.

Built around a central directory of verified professionals, Muck Rack now boasts an extensive directory of top journalists from around the world which can be searched by name, publication or even beat.

Professionals only need a valid Twitter account to apply for verification, although the process is heavily vetted to ensure certain standards are met such as relevance of tweets or posts and consistent activity.

The site also emails out a daily analysis of what journalists are saying called the Muck Rack Daily, which is pored over by its editorial team.

Muck Rack dovetails well with previous Journalism.co.uk tool of the week Press Pass, which organises journalists by beat, media outlet or region.

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#Tip of the day from Journalism.co.uk – making the most of LinkedIn groups

The LinkedIn blog has a guest post which includes advice for publishers in getting the most out of LinkedIn groups.

Monica Wright, community editor at Search Engine Land, shares her tips “that have fostered our group, and built a community that is nearly 40,000 members strong and engaged”.

She explains each of the following headlines in more detail in this post:

1. Set the ground rules
2. Disable news feeds
3. Enable promotions and jobs features
4. Seed the discussion
5. Solicit some help
6. Use manager’s choice
7. Cross-promote discussions
8. Participate in LinkedIn Today

There are an additional 10 tips for journalists from Journalism.co.uk.

Tipster: Sarah Marshall

If you have a tip you would like to submit to us at Journalism.co.uk email us using this link– we will pay a fiver for the best ones published.

 

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#Tip of the day from Journalism.co.uk – using LinkedIn as a journalist

TheNextWeb has a post outlining some of the best ways journalists can make use of LinkedIn, such as by simply searching for contacts or looking at the financial results of companies of interest.

Journalism.co.uk has also recently compiled a list of ten tips for journalists on using the platform, and a podcast on making the most of the site which includes an interview with Krista Canfield, senior manager of corporate communications (consumer PR) at LinkedIn.

Tipster: Rachel McAthy

If you have a tip you would like to submit to us at Journalism.co.uk email us using this link– we will pay a fiver for the best ones published.

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Tool of the week for journalists – Rippla, for tracking the social ‘ripples’ of news stories

Tool of the week: Rippla

What is it? A tool that allows you to monitor the social media “ripples” of a news story

How is it of use to journalists? Rippla was launched last month as a tool that tracks how news and information reaches into people’s conversations on social media.

It may be interesting to find out that the story with the most “ripples” is currently the Mail Online’s Hilarious video shows cat stroking crying baby and sending him to sleep, followed by George Monbiot’s Guardian comment This bastardised libertarianism makes ‘freedom’ an instrument of oppression, But what is particularly helpful for journalists is the ripples tracker.

Ripples tracker allows you to enter the URL or a news story and see how many times it has been shared on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and other social networks and find out how many bit.ly click-throughs the post has received.

Rippla also offers news sites a widget than can be added (as embedded below), which displays the most socially shared news stories.

Most popular news stories
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Rippla, a site to monitor the social media ‘ripples’ of news stories, launches

Rippla has today launched as a site to track how news stories are shared via social media.

Take a look at the home screen and you will see stories generating the most shares on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and bit.ly.

The site has been created by journalist and political blogger Sunny Hundal who told Journalism.co.uk Rippla “scrapes news feeds from the UK’s 10 biggest news sites and then ranks them by popularity across social networks. It measures how many ‘ripples’ they’ve created.

The second great feature of this site is the widget, which allows you to enter the URL of a news story from your site and see the social media “ripples” it has created.

Hundal said he created the site for two reasons:

First, I want to track how well media organisations do on social media. The site updates and collects the data every hour.

Second, the longer term aim is to provide people an opportunity to consume content based on what their peers are sharing / reading, rather than simply based on what the newspaper front-page offers. As you know, patterns of media consumption are changing and we think this is the way its all heading.

The site will be in beta for some time while bugs are fixed and functionality is added.

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