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Poynter: Online video proves big traffic generator for Miami Herald

February 7th, 2011 | 1 Comment | Posted by in Editors' pick, Multimedia, Online Journalism

The Miami Herald site has seen a 25 per cent increase in visitors as a direct result of using video – making movies the second biggest driver behind its stories.

And it claims part of its success is down to getting rid of reporters and replacing them with videographers.

Visual journalist Chuck Fadely, interviewed on Poynter.org, says having a designated video team frees up reporters to get on with writing and improves the quality of the video output:

Three or four years ago we were training reporters, but we discovered it was like teaching a pig to sing; it annoys the pig and frustrates the teacher. Back then we had a couple of reporters who got it. Since the staff reductions they don’t have time to work on videos, and the quality level was lower, so we’ve basically given up on reporter-produced videos.

While many news sites dismissed video as ineffectual and expensive, the Herald decided to use it to consolidate popular subject areas, increase the time people spent on the site and engage them in new ways.

After showing video for six years it found that sport and breaking news attracted the most viewings, so it concentrated on these areas rather than experimenting. It also started partnering with TV stations to expand its brand.

See the full story on Poynter at this link.

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NUJ’s Journalist magazine gets a makeover

March 22nd, 2010 | 1 Comment | Posted by in Editors' pick, Magazines

The National Union of Journalists magazine, has had its first proper redesign for 17 years, under new editor Christine Buckley. The Journalist worked with designers SurgeryCreations to make the publication more “modern, attractive, informative and engaging,” she said.

And from the electronic version we’ve seen, we think it looks rather nice with some good content, including pieces by former Times media editor Dan Sabbagh and former Guardian journalist David Hencke. “We’re keen that the publication produced for the journalists’ union is of the highest standard, since our audience of  media professionals expects a professional magazine,” said Buckley, in a release.

“I’ve sought to make the new magazine reflective of the diverse, active union that the NUJ is, and I intend that it should echo the voices of our members from across the union.”

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Honouring embargoes

Perhaps a little frivolous to start a Monday morning with, but hey. Journalist to PR promoting new revolutionary social media software: “Yes, I’ll honour the embargo… for the rest of my working life.”

We understand that part 2 is on its way. Follow its creator tech journalist Steve O’Hear / @sohear for details. Strong language warning.

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Columbia Journalism Review: Error prevention tools

January 26th, 2010 | No Comments | Posted by in Editors' pick, Online Journalism

Regret The Error’s Craig Silverman summarises three online services that journalists could use to help prevent errors: gooseGrade, Bite-Size Edit and Artificial Proofreader.

Full post at this link…

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#FollowJourn @ashantiomkar/freelancer

September 24th, 2009 | No Comments | Posted by in Recommended journalists

#FollowJourn: Ashanti Omkar

Who? Freelance broadcast and print journalist in film, music and culture.

What? Omkar pursued journalism after a career in IT and describes herself as journalist, poet and presenter.

Where? @ashantiomkar and www.omkari.com

Contact? theomkarconnection [at] gmail.com

Just as we like to supply you with fresh and innovative tips every day, we’re recommending journalists to follow online too. They might be from any sector of the industry: please send suggestions (you can nominate yourself) to judith or laura [at] journalism.co.uk; or to @journalismnews.

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Freelance Frontline: Let us know what you’re up to

September 22nd, 2009 | No Comments | Posted by in Freelance

Journalism.co.uk has just posted the first in what we hope will become a regular series looking at the work of freelance journalists – in all its many and varied forms.

You can read the first installment featuring Stephen Maughan, on starting out as a freelancer; Mark Joyella, on his role as a ‘community supported journalist'; and new blogger Vik Iyer.

Let us know what you’re working on: we want to hear about published articles, book plans or newly launched websites.

Just finished a big commission? Send us a link. Looking for contributors for a new pitch? Get in touch.

You can drop our news team an email, send us a tweet or leave a comment below.

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Wildfire PR: Computing editor Bryan Glick on the changing face of journalism

September 17th, 2009 | No Comments | Posted by in Editors' pick, Journalism

Worth a read – this interview with Bryan Glick, editor of Computing, on the changes he has witnessed in his career and the last 10 years of journalism.

Glick discusses how the role of Computing as a news outlet has changed with the advent of the internet; the differences in being a journalist ‘now’ and ‘then'; and how the title’s relationship with PRs and technology companies has changed.

One choice quote from Glick:

“I remember the three-inch stack of fading, curled-up fax papers someone had to check in case there was a nugget of news we missed. Today, I couldn’t even tell you what our fax number is.”

Full interview at this link…

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The Jobless Journalist: Week three – To sub or not to sub?

September 15th, 2009 | 5 Comments | Posted by in Job losses, Jobs

This is the third post in a series from an anonymous UK-based journalist recently made redundant. To follow the series, you can subscribe to this feed.

You can also read posts by our previous ‘Redundant Journalist’ blogger at this link.

So far I’ve applied for a total of seven jobs (that’s not including the CVs sent to editors on the off-chance they know of something going). Two of these formal job applications have been for subbing roles.

The question is: I am a writer, not a sub-editor – should I even be applying for these jobs?

I do have a year’s sub-editing experience on the magazine I was made redundant from as well as on a couple of nationals, but I have been warned by editors in the past that I should stick to writing if that’s what I want to do.

I’ve always been of the opinion that sub-editing sharpens your writing and being able to write headlines and standfirsts, for example, can only be a bonus.

What is more, I can see from the sub-editing I have done how this could lead to being an editor, which is ultimately what I want to be.

Sub-editing involves being aware of the overall look of the piece – from pictures to pull quotes – as well as having impeccable grammar and spelling.

What is more, the increasing importance of online journalism means a journalist must be a sort of Judge Dredd character: writer, sub-editor and editor, rolled into one.

But the question still remains – should I apply for sub-editing roles? Or does the fact that I’m even asking this question mean I’ll never get anywhere with an application for a sub-editor’s job vacancy?

After all, if I can’t convince myself, then what chance do I have of convincing an interviewer?

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#FollowJourn: @dankerins/web journalist

September 14th, 2009 | No Comments | Posted by in Recommended journalists

#FollowJourn: Dan Kerins

Who? Web journalist, Southern Daily Echo

What? Prior to joining the Southern Daily Echo, Dan worked as a reporter for the Portsmouth News

Where? @dankerins and @dailyecho

Contact? dan.kerins [at] dailyecho.co.uk

Just as we like to supply you with fresh and innovative tips every day, we’re recommending journalists to follow online too. They might be from any sector of the industry: please send suggestions (you can nominate yourself) to judith or laura [at] journalism.co.uk; or to @journalismnews.

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‘Access Denied': Frontline Club discussion on global media coverage (video)

September 11th, 2009 | 1 Comment | Posted by in Events, Journalism

On Tuesday a panel at the Frontline Club (in association with the BBC College of Journalism) discussed the issue of international media access.

“Fighting in Gaza and Sri Lanka and the recent unrest in Iran all raised questions about how journalists can do their job when governments deny access (…) With the Israeli government relying more and more on public relations management and an increasingly sophisticated use of new media to get its message across, what is the role of the journalist in 21st century conflicts?”

The panel included Richard Sambrook, director of the BBC’s Global News division: Adrian Wells, head of foreign news, Sky News; and Jean Seaton Professor of Media History at the University of Westminster’s Communication and Media Research Institute

If you missed it, catch up with the video here. And it was live-blogged by Brian Condon here.

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