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Regional newspaper editor asks for job applications via Twitter

September 12th, 2011 | 1 Comment | Posted by in Editors' pick, Jobs, Social media and blogging

Could you sell your skills as a journalist to a potential employer in just 140 characters? Because that is exactly what one editor is asking of potential new recruits.

Alan Geere, editor-in-chief of the Essex Chronicle Media Group and editorial director of Northcliffe Media South East, says he is “fed up of wading through turgid ‘letters of application’ and monstrous CVs”, so instead he is inviting applications for the latest journalism role at the title via Twitter.

In a blog post, Geere vents his frustration at receiving CVs from people he considers to be “would-be journalists who were obviously asleep during the class on intro writing”.

So in a bid to change this he is insisting anyone interested in the latest roles available at the publisher to respond via Twitter to his account @alangeere, giving them just 140 characters to explain what they can do and why they should be considered.

I keep getting told there is an over-supply of qualified people wanting to do journalism. Well, maybe there is but there’s definitely not an over-supply of people who are any good.

It’s an interesting tactic and should hopefully spark some creativity from some entrants, but I do wonder how much you can learn about a person in 140 characters? The other question is about those who wish to keep their application a secret, especially from their current employer/colleagues. I would assume direct messages are the answer here, but will of course require Geere to follow any of those recruits before they can demonstrate their abilities.

See his full blog post here and feel free to leave your thoughts below.

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BetaTales: Print journalists, beware ‘the typographers’ trap’

December 9th, 2010 | No Comments | Posted by in Editors' pick, Journalism

What is the typographers’ trap and why do other print journalists need to know about it? A thoughtful post on skills, careers and a changing industry from BetaTales:

It describes how a group by wrongly trying to save the jobs of its members at the same time destroys its own profession.

Typographers used to hold an important position in editorial newspaper production. In the old days this was the group typesetting the newspaper pages.

Then the production process was digitalised. Suddenly anybody with basic design and computer skills could do the tasks the typographers used to have a monopoly of doing.

In fact the need for typographers in newspaper production was more or less wiped out in a very short time frame. As a result the profession disappeared in most countries.

Full post on BetaTales at this link…

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The Australian: Digital boosting morale in Australia’s newsrooms despite job losses

December 9th, 2010 | No Comments | Posted by in Editors' pick, Newspapers, Online Journalism

A look at the Future of Journalism study released by Australian industry group the Media, Entertainment and Arts Alliance, which suggests that despite 700 job losses in the metropolitan news industry in the country since 2008, morale is still relatively high amongst working journalists.

Full story on the Australian at this link…

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Does a blog still cut it for journalism students?

November 19th, 2010 | 1 Comment | Posted by in Editors' pick, Training

Following a journalism event earlier this month on blogging your way into a job, City University London journalism student Rajvir Rai takes a more reflective look at the advice given:

[I]t is clear that a few years ago a blog really set you apart from crowd, but now with a plethora of people (including many who have no desire to become professional journalists) jumping on the bandwagon, standing out to the extent that the industry recognises you is becoming increasingly difficult – if not impossible.

Unless you have stuck upon a totally unique idea it is unlikely that your blog will be the reason you get a job. Using myself as a case study, I blog about areas that interest me (sport, Asian issues and the media) and I do okay out of it, but I don’t for one minute think that a potential employer will be impressed enough with this site to offer me a job.

If simply having a blog won’t cut it anymore, how else can journalism students make themselves stand out online?

Full post at this link…

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What can our jobs board tell us about the market?

November 1st, 2010 | 1 Comment | Posted by in Editors' pick, Jobs

Freelance Unbound has produced a great post looking at the current state of the journalism jobs market, based on data analysis of Journalism.co.uk’s own job listings.

Judging by their analysis, it seems that roles in specialist business journalism for publications based in London are your best bet:

The most telling items in the chart are the tiny slices for lifestyle and celebrity – the most popular media choices for j-students – and for general news reporting. Very few jobs are advertised in these areas (at least here).

Full post on Freelance Unbound at this link…

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What’s in a journalism job ad? Analysing the skills required by employers

September 21st, 2010 | 1 Comment | Posted by in Jobs, Training

Following on from our laid-off report looking at journalism job losses and how the shape of the journalism workforce in the UK is changing, I thought it would be interesting to do a quick analysis of the job ads currently available on Journalism.co.uk. What requirements and skills are employers stipulating and which are the most popular?

(I took the text from job ads on the site that list requirements or candidate profiles and have tried to take out irrelevant words as much as possible)

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Broadcast journalist Michael Goldfarb on life after redundancy

September 2nd, 2010 | No Comments | Posted by in Broadcasting, Editors' pick, Job losses, Jobs

PoynterOnline.org has an interesting but unfortunately all-too-familiar story of a journalist – Michael Goldfarb – who lost his job during company cut backs five years ago. In an interview he shares his experiences of finding his feet as a freelancer and at times the realisisation of how little his years of experience would help him in his job search.

It was 5 July 2005, the day of the London bombings which Goldfarb had spent hours in the studio covering. When he got a call from his boss, he expected it would be to congratulate him on his work, but instead it was to break the news that his job was being cut.

Goldfarb soon returned to his post-WBUR life as a freelance journalist following failed attempts to find teaching work  – his 20 years of experience seemingly not enough to replace a lacking MA – but while financially he remains at a loss, Goldfarb’s talents as a journalist don’t seem to have gone unnoticed, with current projects including a monthly BBC TV news discussion, work with Globalpost.com and a new book in the pipeline.

But he remains concerned about an industry which he feels has given up on serving its audience.

I feel like a cavalry officer who has had two horses shot out from under him in the same battle. Serious reporting, serious writing: where is the audience for it in America anymore? I know It’s there, but the people who manage the news and book business have given up trying to serve it.

See the full interview here…

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OJR: Advice for new journalism students

August 23rd, 2010 | 1 Comment | Posted by in Editors' pick, Jobs, Traffic

Robert Niles, writing on the Online Journalism Review site, offers five top tips for students about to embark on a journalism course at university or college in the coming weeks.

In summary, his recommendations are:

  • Don’t believe that journalism school will help you prepare for your career. Why? Because your journalism career’s already started.
  • Audience equals power for journalism job-seekers. Start building your own online straight away.
  • Your career is only as strong as your network. Follow the right people.
  • Pursue your passion, and develop expertise within it. Become an expert in a field that stirs your passion.
  • Conduct yourself as a journalist, at all times.

The overall message from Niles is for students to use the internet to make their own opportunities – “never wait for someone to hire you before starting to work”.

See the full post here…

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Bloomberg to begin hiring in Washington DC for new policy news wire

August 19th, 2010 | No Comments | Posted by in Business, Data, Politics

Financial news wire Bloomberg will be creating jobs for more than 100 journalists and analysts in Washington DC with the release of its new policy news service Bloomberg Government, according to a report by the Reynolds Center for Business Journalism.

The resource, which is currently in development stages, advertises itself as “a customized resource for professionals who need to understand the business implications of government actions in real time”.

This comprehensive, subscription-based, online tool collects best-in-class data, provides high-end analysis and analytic tools, and delivers deep, reliable, quick and unbiased reporting from a team of more than 2,300 journalists and multimedia specialists worldwide. It also offers news aggregated from thousands of the top trusted news sources from around the globe.

Those interested in filling the new roles will need to be data-focused and able to combine reporting skills with policy information analysis, a spokeswoman told the Reynolds Center.

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Why a journalism degree will only get you so far

August 12th, 2010 | 3 Comments | Posted by in Editors' pick, Jobs, Magazines, Training

Got a journalism degree but can’t get a job? It’s a struggle facing countless graduates at the moment, but what is the actual value of a degree in such a competitive industry?

According to Canadian graduate Laura Drake, writing on the Macleans ‘OnCampus’ magazine website, no one should think spending a few years at university is a golden pass to employment.

What a journalism undergraduate degree will get you are amazing memories, good connections with profs who know hundreds of working journalists, marketable skills in the form of writing and communications abilities. What it will not get you, and what no one ever promises it will get you, is a job in journalism.

To be clear, in my recollection, no one at j-skool ever lied about this, either. I’m pretty sure that from literally day one, lectures included messages from profs that, if you wanted to get a job in journalism on the other side, then you were going to have to hustle outside of class. A journalism degree on its own is never, ever going to get anyone a job in media. Students, newspaper experience, community radio, working for small-town media, free work placements, academic exchanges and, at this point, extra curricular web experience are basically mandatory if you’re interested in hunting for a job.

It’s as I was always told, every qualification, experience and contact is like a key. The more keys you have, the more doors you can open.

See her full post here…

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