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#Tip: How often should you be posting to social media?

Image by shawncampbell on Flickr. Some rights reserved.

Image by shawncampbell on Flickr. Some rights reserved.

Social media might be a great tool for communication, but we all know someone who is a chronic over-sharer.

There’s nothing worse than having your timelines full of someone else’s verbal diarrhoea (and if the person in question is you, it’s a sure-fire way to get yourself unfollowed).

So how many times should you be posting to Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and Google+?

This post on the Buffer blog highlights the importance of striking “the balance between informative and annoying”.

While it doesn’t exactly deliver a cut-and-dried answer, it does offer recommendations from a range of sources – including Buffer’s own strategy for social sharing.

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#Tip: How to organise your Facebook news feed

By owenwbrown on Flickr. Some rights reserved.

By owenwbrown on Flickr. Some rights reserved.

If your Facebook news feed is a muddle of cat pictures, news stories, and yawn-inducing posts from that girl at school you haven’t spoken to in 10 years, you might want some help getting organised.

Luckily Mashable has some great tips for curating a Facebook news feed, including ways to see more (or less) from certain friends and creating personalised news lists – a great way to track news around certain areas and topics.

And even though it’s not possible to eliminate advertisements entirely from the platform, Mashable shows you how to let Facebook know whether those ads for facial hair removal are really relevant for you.

 

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#Podcast: Balancing breaking news and light-hearted stories on social

November 15th, 2013 | No Comments | Posted by in Podcast, Social media and blogging
Image by Thinkstock

Image by Thinkstock

When a big story breaks, should a large news outlet still be sharing news about light-hearted stories?

How many updates are too many when it comes to sharing information around a breaking news story? And how do you create stories that are sharable?

To find out the answers, Sarah Marshall, technology editor at Journalism.co.uk, speaks to:

  • Anna Doble, head of online, Channel 4 News
  • Mark Frankel, assistant editor of social news, BBC

You can hear future podcasts by signing up to the Journalism.co.uk podcast feed on iTunes.

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#Tip: Read this post on the ‘psychology of social media sharing’

Image by IsaacMao on Flickr. Some rights reserved

Image by IsaacMao on Flickr. Some rights reserved

One of the sessions at MozFest, the Mozilla Festival held at the weekend, was about the “psychology of social media sharing”.

Sonya Song, a Knight-Mozilla OpenNews fellow based at the Boston Globe and a PhD candidate in media and information studies, shared a study she had carried out into Facebook sharing.

She looked at how stories posted on the Boston Globe’s Facebook page were shared.

Here are a few key takeaways:

  • Easier words and language results in better engagement on social
  • Larger images do better than small ones
  • Asking a question on Facebook leads to 80 per cent more comments
  • The least conversational stories, those resulting in comments, are factual
  • Adding ‘BREAKING NEWS’ to a story increases click throughs

She has written a detailed blog post outlining her findings, which is well worth a read.

 

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#Tip: Three ways journalists can use Facebook more effectively

By owenwbrown on Flickr. Some rights reserved.

By owenwbrown on Flickr. Some rights reserved.

On Storyful’s blog, Joe Galvin runs through three ways to use Facebook as a journalist, aimed at improving “efficiency” when scouring the social network for news sources and leads.

Journalism.co.uk has also produced a guide to searching social networks, including Facebook.

If you have a tip you would like to submit to us at Journalism.co.uk email us using this link.
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#Tip: Remember these social media shortcuts

Image by Thinkstock

Image by Thinkstock

Social media is a necessary evil in journalism, whether it’s for publishing, sourcing, communicating or networking, and with time being an increasingly precious resource anything to speed up the process is well received.

These social media shortcuts from Quintly hit the nail on the head in that respect, acting as a cheat sheet for quick ways around Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Google+. Well worth scribbling on a post-it note and sticking to your monitor.

If you have a tip you would like to submit to us at Journalism.co.uk email us using this link.

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#Tip: Try these tips to boost your hyperlocal Facebook page

By owenwbrown on Flickr. Some rights reserved.

By owenwbrown on Flickr. Some rights reserved.

Pictures. Personality. Timeliness. Tips and tools for building online communities can sometimes seem rather general but blogger and journalist Ed Walker decided to put them all into practice for his hyperlocal site Blog Preston.

See how it worked for him and the detailed highlights of what made his month long campaign a success in this blog post.

If you have a tip you would like to submit to us at Journalism.co.uk email us using this link.

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#Tip: Facebook to introduce comment replies and more

By owenwbrown on Flickr. Some rights reserved.

By owenwbrown on Flickr. Some rights reserved.

Facebook this week announced it would be introducing new features for comments which will, according to a post by journalism programme manager Vadim Lavrusik, enable journalists to “reply directly to comments left on your Page content and start conversation threads”.

Lavrusik says discussions will also be “re-ordered by relevance to viewers” and those considered the most “active and engaging” will also work their way to the top.

According to the Facebook for Journalists post, the new functionality, which users can opt-in to, will be available on pages from 10 July. Lavrusik adds that it will also “be automatically turned on for profiles with more than 10,000 followers”.

Incidentally, Lavrusik will be delivering the keynote speech at news:rewired on Friday 19 April.

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#Tip of the day for journalists: Using Facebook to find stories

Storyful, a service that partners with media companies to aggregate and verify news from social networks, has a guide to Facebook for journalists.

The blog post by Storyful.com editor Fiona McCann explains how journalists can use Facebook’s own search facility, and recommends a tool for anyone who is not logged into a Facebook account.

The post explains how to search public posts by ‘group’, ‘people’ and ‘pages’ within Facebook, and shows how to click on ‘see more results’ to bring up “a host of search filters”.

McCann also recommends Open Status Search [formerly known as Open Facebook Search] and has another great tip:

Open Status Search also offers a ‘get embed code’ button which offers the easily-copied html code for embedding a particular search on your own site, with options to customise width, height and number of search items displayed.

Read the full Storyful blog post.

If you have a tip you would like to submit to us at Journalism.co.uk email us using this link.

 

 

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#Tip of the day for journalists – using Facebook for news gathering and more

Social news wire Storyful runs through the different ways journalists can use Facebook in this recent blog post, both for news gathering and finding leads as well as community engagement.

For more on using Facebook, here is a Journalism.co.uk guide to using Facebook Subscribe and a feature looking at how ProPublica is using a Facebook group to generate conversation and a support network around an investigation.

If you have a tip you would like to submit to us at Journalism.co.uk email us using this link.

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