Browse > Home / Archive by category 'Search'

#Tip of the day for journalists: Use ‘define’ to check a dictionary definition

February 22nd, 2013 | No Comments | Posted by in Search, Top tips for journalists
Image by plentyofants on Flickr. Some rights reserved

Image by plentyofants on Flickr. Some rights reserved

As a journalist you no doubt have to check a dictionary definition now and again. It may be to check the meaning or to reassure yourself you have the correct word (compliment or complement, illicit or elicit, virality or virility, for example).

You will see from this list of errors that appeared on the New York Times site that sometimes a spell check does not help.

So do you reach for a book, launch an application or look to an online dictionary? A quick way is to use the Google advanced operator to give you the result.

Type ‘define:keyword‘ into your Google search bar and you will be given a result.

For example, here I typed ‘define:complement’ into Google.

define

 

Tags: ,

Similar posts:

#Tip of the day for journalists: Set up a custom site search in Alfred

February 21st, 2013 | No Comments | Posted by in Search, Top tips for journalists

Alfred

Mac users may be familiar with a free productivity tool that is available in the App Store called Alfred.

Alfred is a powerful tool that allows you to launch and search apps and web sites in a couple of clicks.

For example, you can open Alfred (by pressing ‘alt’ and ‘space’) and then carry out a calculation, search your contacts or start typing the the name of an application and launch it.

If you are a Mac user and journalist, you probably find yourself carrying out a number of site searches a day to find previously published content.

For example, I have carried out a number of site searches today to find previously published content on Journalism.co.uk. I could do this typing the Google advanced operator site:journalism.co.uk into my Google search box followed by the query (for example site:journalism.co.uk “tip of the day”). As I have Alfred set up to perform this site search I can run the search in 21 fewer clicks.

Here’s how:

  • Open Alfred and go to ‘preferences’ (the shortcut is ‘Apple’ and ‘,’)
  • Go to ‘features‘ then ‘custom searches

alfred-custom

  • Type the following into the first box, replacing ‘journalism.co.uk’ with your site URL.

http://www.google.co.uk/search?q=site:journalism.co.uk%20{query}

  • Fill in the other fields, choosing a shortcut for your site. For example, I picked the letter J so when I open Alfred (‘alt’ and ‘space’) I can type ‘J’ and then my keyword search. Alfred launches Chrome and displays the search results.

Alfred-search

That saves me typing site:journalism.co.uk every time I need to search.

There is more on Alfred’s custom search here.

 

Tags: , ,

Similar posts:

#Tip of the day for journalists: Add Twitter search to your browser

February 20th, 2013 | No Comments | Posted by in Search, Top tips for journalists
Image by shawncampbell on Flickr. Some rights reserved.

Image by shawncampbell on Flickr. Some rights reserved.

Today’s tip is to add a Twitter address bar search browser extension. That will mean you can search Twitter from the search bar at the top of your web browser.

The Firefox extension is at this link, or you can use the search dropdown to ‘manage search engines’ and access this search option and more.

Firefox Twitter

The Chrome extension is at this link. This extension adds a search bar to Chrome (which will appear as a magnifying glass logo), with Twitter as one of the options.

Chrome

 

You can carryout hashtag searches, user searches or enter Twitter advanced operators. For more on searching social media see this guide.

You might also like to add a Creative Commons Search option to Firefox, which was Monday’s tip of the day.

Tags: , ,

Similar posts:

#Tip of the day for journalists: Add Creative Commons Search to your browser

February 18th, 2013 | No Comments | Posted by in Search, Top tips for journalists
Creative-Commons

Image by Yohei Yamashita on Flickr. Some rights reserved

 

Today’s tip for journalists is to add the Creative Commons Search to Firefox.

Creative Commons images and other content can be used by news sites and blogs free of charge. Here at Journalism.co.uk we regularly use images shared with Creative Commons licences on Flickr and other sites.

Those who use such images will no doubt be aware of the Creative Commons Search. Did you know there is an option that allows you to add the search to the Firefox browser?

Creative Commons Firefox

To add the option, go follow the link near the bottom of this Creative Commons Search page. You can then select the CC Search option and speed up the process of finding images.

When searching for Creative Commons content, don’t forget to tick the box that includes results that can be used for commercial purposes.

CC-search

Tags: ,

Similar posts:

#Tip of the day for journalists: Search for open government data

January 31st, 2013 | No Comments | Posted by in Data, Search, Top tips for journalists
magnifying glass Flickr Ivy Dawned

Image by Ivy Dawned on Flickr. Some rights reserved

Here’s a tip from Paul Bradshaw, academic and the journalist behind the Online Journalism Blog and Help Me Investigate:

 

Screen Shot 2013-01-31 at 16.33.12

He suggests using Google advanced operators to search .gov.uk sites with the word ‘open’ in the URL.

Want to take your online research to the next level? Take a look at this one-day course which teaches advanced online research skills.

Tags: , , ,

Similar posts:

#Tip of the day for journalists: Check analytics to see what people are searching for

January 22nd, 2013 | No Comments | Posted by in Search, Top tips for journalists

magnifying glass Flickr Ivy Dawned

Do you ever check your site’s analytics to see what people are searching for?  Mindy McAdams has and provides an interesting explainer on her Teaching Online Journalism blog.

McAdams says that searches can help you write about what your audience is searching for.

If people are coming to your site because of a search, you should think about whether you might want to offer them more on that topic. I don’t mean you should add stuff that doesn’t match the mission or purpose of your blog — but think about whether it makes sense for you to beef up your content to satisfy those searchers.

Her post reminded me of this great example of how Homicide Watch reports from analytics.

The site’s founder Laura Amico checked what her readers had been searching for one afternoon in Google Analytics one afternoon and got a scoop.

She found that readers of Homicide Watch DC, a site she set up in September 2010 to report on murders in Washington DC, were looking for details of an unreported murder.

There’s more on that story here.

If you have a tip you would like to submit to us at Journalism.co.uk email us using this link.

Tags: ,

Similar posts:

#Tip of the day for journalists: Save this list of research databases

December 17th, 2012 | No Comments | Posted by in Search, Top tips for journalists

US site for journalists Poynter has compiled a list of research sites you can use when working on an in-depth story.

The post explains that many academics are publishing their research online as “the world of scholarship is creeping toward greater openness”.

The post’s author John Wihbey states:

It’s also important to acknowledge that conventional web searches — just Googling it — won’t necessarily turn up the best research materials; search algorithms don’t always prominently highlight studies and reports that are seldom linked to or visited.

Wihbey recommends a number of sites, including Google Scholar and Microsoft Academic Search. Some sites are US specific. The full list is at this link.

If you have a tip you would like to submit to us at Journalism.co.uk email us using this link.

Tags: ,

Similar posts:

#Tip of the day for journalists: Save to Drive Chrome extension

December 13th, 2012 | No Comments | Posted by in Search, Top tips for journalists

Image by stshank on Flickr. Some rights reserved.

Mashable yesterday reported on a new extension called Save to Drive for Google Chrome, which offers users a button to let them save content online straight to their Google Drive.

As Mashable reports, users can “save an image, an entire page or an image of the visible page to your Drive”, as well as “the HTML source code of a webpage or a complete webpage in web archive (.mht) format”.

This might prove useful for journalists who come across content while searching the web.

If you have a tip you would like to submit to us at Journalism.co.uk email us using this link.

 

Tags: , ,

Similar posts:

#Tip of the day for journalists: Learn how to find ‘hidden’ web content

December 4th, 2012 | No Comments | Posted by in Search, Top tips for journalists

Image by Nit Soto on Flickr. Some rights reserved

Investigative journalist Colin Meek (who also leads courses in advanced online research skills) has created a visualisation on how to search the ‘hidden’ web.

Introducing the visualisation, Meek says when training others in research skills, he has found that there is “a lot of confusion about exactly why a lot of web content is ‘hidden’ from view and why ordinary search engines are not only hopeless at reaching ‘hidden web’ content they are doing an increasingly poor job of accessing breaking news or ‘real-time media”.

Follow this link to see Meek’s “conceptual description of the four main data sources available to journalists and researchers: the hidden web, the searchable web, people and breaking news”.

He includes notes on the best research tools available.

If you have a tip you would like to submit to us at Journalism.co.uk email us using this link.

Tags: ,

Similar posts:

#Tip of the day for journalists: Learn from fake Hurricane Sandy pictures

October 30th, 2012 | No Comments | Posted by in Search, Top tips for journalists

There are a couple of good posts on how to verify images from social media following the sharing of fake Hurricane Sandy pictures on Twitter and Facebook.

Fiona McCann from social news agency Storyful has written a guide on how to spot a fake image in three easy steps. She talks through the process of using Google Images and TinEye and reminds journalists to check sources.

On Poynter Craig Silverman has shared links to useful verification articles.

Here is a guide on verification published earlier this year by Journalism.co.uk.

If you have a tip you would like to submit to us at Journalism.co.uk email us using this link.

 

Tags: ,

Similar posts:

© Mousetrap Media Ltd. Theme: modified version of Statement