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#Tip: Watch video of social video panel from Social Media Summit

Image by petesimon on Flickr. Some rights reserved

Image by petesimon on Flickr. Some rights reserved

The BBC College of Journalism has posted video on YouTube of a panel on creating social video, which was held at the Social Media Summit in New York last month.

The panel featured Roy Sekoff, president and co-creator of HuffPost Live, Katherine Zaleski, managing editor of NowThis News and Olivia Ma, head of news and media partnerships at Google+. Watch the video below to hear more about some of the different approaches being taken in making video a more social experience for news consumers, across platforms.

And here’s more on HuffPost Live as well as NowThisNews, on their approaches to social video,

Hat tip: Paul Bradshaw, who also posted the video on his Tumblr

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#Podcast – Snow Fall and beyond: A look at long-form online storytelling

Thinkstock

Thinkstock

Following last month’s the Pulitzer prize for New York Times sports reporter John Branch, the author of Snow Fall: The Avalanche at Tunnel Creek, and this week’s Webby Awards which also recognised examples of beautiful long-form storytelling online, this week’s podcast looks at some of the exciting ways newspapers and others are telling in-depth stories on digital platforms.

The podcast addresses some of the issues which arise when bringing together long-form narrative with powerful visuals and interactivity, including the sorts of stories which best suit this approach, the benefits for audiences, journalists and news outlets, and the need for experimentation, even if on a smaller scale.

We speak to:

You can hear future podcasts by signing up to the Journalism.co.uk iTunes podcast feed.

We will have more on Journalism.co.uk next week from the podcast interviewees on this subject.

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#Tip: Pointers for growing your Twitter following

While it may not all be about quantity, journalists and news outlets alike are undoubtedly keen to grow a large, and engaged community on social networks with which to share and discuss their content. This how-to by David Beard on the Poynter Institute website runs through  a list of “eight ways to attract more Twitter followers” looking at both the content being tweeted as well as the way the tweet itself is constructed.

If you have a tip you would like to submit to us at Journalism.co.uk email us using this link.

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#Tip: Curation considerations for journalists

This post on MediaHelpingMedia about curation acts as a helpful reminder of some of the things journalists working in this area should consider. Author David Brewer also highlights the “rules” set out by different curation platforms.

If you have a tip you would like to submit to us at Journalism.co.uk email us using this link.

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#Tip of the day for journalists: Digital projects to inspire multimedia storytelling

New York Times's Snowfall package

New York Times’s Snowfall package

On the 10,000 Words blog Lauren Rabaino puts a spotlight on ten different examples of “innovative storytelling formats”, prompted by the New York Times Snowfall package, which could inspire others considering similar projects.

If you have a tip you would like to submit to us at Journalism.co.uk email us using this link.

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#Podcast: Best practice pointers for handling online news corrections

January 11th, 2013 | No Comments | Posted by in Online Journalism, Podcast

Report error button

This week’s podcast looks at recommended approaches to correcting errors, with advice shared by industry experts, including how to measure common mistakes, avoid errors with accuracy checklists and produce clear and well-circulated online corrections.

The podcast hears from:

  • Craig Silverman, editor, Regret the Error
  • Greg Brock, senior editor for standards, New York Times
  • Steve Buttry, digital transformation editor, Digital First Media

Here are some more resources relating to best practice in online corrections:

 

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Nic Newman: Journalism, media and technology predictions for 2013

January 11th, 2013 | No Comments | Posted by in Editors' pick, Online Journalism
Crystall-ball-410

Image by mararie on Flickr. Some rights reserved

Digital strategist Nic Newman has written a 30-page Google Doc on his predictions for journalism, media and technology this year.

The ex-BBC strategist provides a really good summary of key developments in digital journalism in 2012, and makes a few predictions for this year.

In addition to predicting the rise of mobile (he uses the buzzword of the week ‘phablet’, which has been used to describe the hybrid, larger phones that are approaching tablet size), he makes another point he makes is one of visual storytelling and the importance of images. That leads into him noting the rise of TV-style coverage by online news sites, including WSJ Live, the Huffington Post and the New York Times.

Following WSJ’s launch of WorldStream, a platform where reporters at the title share mobile phone footage to provide a behind-the-scene glimpse of the newsgathering process, Newman forecasts that in 2013 we’ll see “more experimentation with short-form video”, with this area offering “significant opportunities for newspapers and start-ups to disrupt traditional broadcasters”.

Another trend he notes is one of real-time news and he makes predictions around paywalls.

The Washington Post and at least two national UK newspapers will join the metered paywall club in 2013.

The full document is at this link.

Related: In this article, seven industry experts share their predictions for this year.

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#Podcast: What skills do journalists need in the newsroom of 2013?

January 4th, 2013 | No Comments | Posted by in Online Journalism, Podcast, Training
Toolbox

Image by Jen Durfey on Flickr. Some rights reserved

In this week’s Journalism.co.uk podcast technology editor Sarah Marshall speaks to key industry figures about the skills journalists need in today’s digital newsroom.

She speaks to:

  • Steve Herrmann, editor, BBC News Online
  • Alison Gow, editor of the Daily Post and DailyPost.co.uk, North Wales
  • Aron Pilhofer, editor of interactive news, New York Times
  • Mark Little, founder and chief executive of social news agency Storyful

The four share their advice on the skills needed, explaining why a journalist needs to be a jack of all trades, and tell us whether or not shorthand is still a required skill.

You can hear future podcasts by signing up to the Journalism.co.uk iTunes podcast feed.

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Ofcom report: TV main source ‘of most types of news’ except celebrity news and gossip

December 14th, 2012 | 1 Comment | Posted by in Online Journalism

By Brylle on Arte & Fotographia. Some rights reserved.

Consumer research by Ofcom released in a study on Thursday reports that TV is the main source of news across all the countries analysed in the research, except for celebrity news and gossip for which the internet came top.

The research was based on an online survey of at least 1000 respondents from each country included (UK, France, Germany, Italy, USA, Japan, Australia and Spain) who were asked about “which platform they used as their main source for different types of news: national, international, sports, and celebrity news”. Answers included TV, online, radio, newspapers, magazines and “from other people”.

The study reports that “online consumers in the UK are less likely to use the internet as a main source of national news than those in Italy and Spain”, and across all countries included in the report television “is the main source of most types of news”, apart from celebrity news and gossip which was more likely to be sourced from the internet.

Although the most-cited main sources of news for online users generally are TV and the internet, across the countries in the sample there are subtle differences in consumption patterns.

When asked about their main source for national news, the platform named most often was TV, followed by the internet. In the UK, almost half (48 per cent) selected TV as their main source of national news. Respondents in France were more likely to state that they used TV as their main source of national news, where almost six in ten (58 per cent) selected TV as their main source and 26 per cent selected the internet.

A similar picture emerges in Australia, where 53 per cent mainly access national news on TV and 31 per cent via the internet. This contrasts with Italy where the internet is more likely to be used as a main source of national news, with 48 per cent of respondents using this platform, compared to 40 per cent naming TV.

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#Tip: ScribbleLive launches internal chat feature to help journalists communicate

Image by Wiertz Sebastien on Flickr. Some rights reserved.

Earlier this week liveblogging platform ScribbleLive announced the launch of a new internal chat feature within its software which enables journalists working on a liveblog to directly communicate and share multimedia privately.

In a post announcing the feature ScribbleLive said it “eliminates the need for content creators to be in the same room or on the same email thread”.

We caught up with ScribbleLive chief executive Michael De Monte who said the feature was “one of the most requested features we’ve had from our customers”.

What it allows our customers to do is basically consult back and forth about what kind of content to publish, when to publish it and all of this is basically a private channel for them to speak to each other.

People can create content from multiple locations, in fact from multiple places around the world and multiple devices, so we decided to incorporate this feature to allow them to have an ability to say, for example, ‘hey are you going to get that photo from such-and-such, and can you publish it as soon as you have it available’, and you can have this private conversation that is not exposed to the real world.

Even if you happen to be in the same city or perhaps even in the same office, not necessarily sitting beside each other, it’s just a really great way to say ‘ok well why don’t you take care of moderation now and I’m going to go and look for some more images on x, y and z’ and that way you don’t have to have a secondary application running.

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