Browse > Home / Archive by category 'Media releases'

Your guide to the CMS Report on the Future for Local and Regional Media

April 6th, 2010 | No Comments | Posted by in Local media, Media releases, Newspapers

The UK parliament’s cross-party Culture, Media and Sport Committee published the results of its year-long inquiry into the state and future of local and regional UK media today, calling for greater investigation of and stronger rules for council-run newspapers.

“We endorse the sentiment that it is local journalism, rather than local newspapers, that needs saving,” says the report.

“The two are far from mutually exclusive, but newspapers need to be innovative in the way they train their journalists to work in a multiplatform world.”

The full report is embedded below, courtesy of Scribd, and you can read previous Journalism.co.uk reports on the committee’s evidence sessions at this link. But for your perusing pleasure, here’s our breakdown of some of the key sections and quotes:

  • p4 – “the broadcast pool”: “We take note of the Press Association’s concerns about the exclusivity of the ‘broadcast pool’ (video content of news events that are only allowed to be covered by a single camera, and is then shared between the BBC, ITN and Sky) and conclude that it is no longer appropriate to distinguish between broadcast and non-broadcast media when newspapers are increasingly using video on their websites.”
  • p9 – breakdown of local media operators and owners;
  • p11 – the role of local and regional newspapers in “the news pyramid”;
  • p16 – “We welcome the BBC’s proposals to increase the number of external links on its websites. We recommend that every local BBC website should link to the local newspaper websites for that area.”
  • p17 – Committee’s views on state subsidies for local and regional media.
  • p17-21 – recommendations for changes to cross-media ownership rules and regulations;
  • p24-5 – recommendations regarding local authority newspapers and council publications;
  • p28 – “For a long time local newspapers have made relatively little change to their business models. Now, along with the other traditional media platforms of television and radio, they face a vast array of digital and internet services, providing relatively easy market entry, all vying for advertising revenue and readerships. While some economic factors are cyclical, other changes of a structural nature are likely to be permanent. As is clear from the evidence we have heard from local newspapers themselves, local newspapers must innovate and re-evaluate the traditional model of local print media in order to survive in the new digital era.”
  • p33 – “the PSB obligations and other regulatory burdens on ITV need to be reduced, if not removed”;
  • p38 – recommendations regarding the Independently Funded News Consortia (IFNC) plans – though these are a little out of date given that the winning bids for the pilots have now been announced;
  • p51Local radio and localness and the importance of community radio.
  • p60-4 – On Google’s impact on local newspapers.

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Similar posts:

PCC upholds complaint over Rod Liddle’s Spectator post; first ever blog censure

Just in from the Press Complaints Commission: its first ever magazine/newspaper blog censure – for Rod Liddle’s 92 word Spectator post on 5 December 2009, that claimed an “overwhelming majority of street crime, knife crime, gun crime, robbery and crimes of sexual violence in London is carried out by young men from the African-Caribbean community”. A reader’s complaint of inaccuracy was upheld.

“This is a significant ruling because it shows that the PCC expects the same standards in newspaper and magazine blogs that it would expect in comment pieces that appear in print editions,” said PCC director, Stephen Abell.

“There is plenty of room for robust opinions, views and commentary but statements of fact must still be substantiated if and when they are disputed.  And if substantiation isn’t possible, there should be proper correction by the newspaper or magazine in question.”

[Update: Listen to PCC director Stephen Abell discuss the ruling on the BBC Radio 4 Today Programme at this link]

Here’s the PCC’s statement:

The Press Complaints Commission has upheld a complaint about an entry by Rod Liddle in his blog for the Spectator.  This is the first time that the PCC has censured a newspaper or magazine over the content of a journalistic blog.

The piece in question was published on 5 December 2009 and claimed that “the overwhelming majority of street crime, knife crime, gun crime, robbery and crimes of sexual violence in London is carried out by young men from the African-Caribbean community”.  A reader complained that the statement was incorrect.

In concluding that the article was indeed in breach of Clause 1 (Accuracy) of the Editors’ Code of Practice, the PCC recognised the magazine’s argument that the nature of a blog post is often provocative and conducive to discussion.  It was certainly true in this case, for example, that a number of readers had taken issue with Mr Liddle’s claim and had commented on the blog.

However, the Commission did not agree that the magazine could rely on publishing critical reaction as a way of abrogating its responsibilities under the Code.  While it had provided some evidence to back up Mr Liddle’s position, it had not been able to demonstrate that the ‘overwhelming majority’ of crime in all the stated categories had been carried out by members of the African-Caribbean community.

Nor could it successfully argue that the claim was purely the columnist’s opinion – rather, it was a statement of fact.  As such, the Commission believed that “the onus was on the magazine to ensure that it was corrected authoritatively online”.  In the absence of such remedial action the Commission upheld the complaint.

Tags: , , , ,

Similar posts:

Media Release: Social networks to fall under Advertising Standards Authority’s remit

The Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) could see its remit extended to cover marketing activity on companies’ websites and social networks, it was announced yesterday.

Says the Advertising Association’s (AA) release, which can be downloaded at this link:

The Advertising Association (AA) has submitted the industry’s recommendations to the Committee of Advertising Practice (CAP), for the extension of the non-broadcast Advertising Code in digital media, which will be administered by the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA). This landmark move for advertising self-regulation seeks to address societal concerns and will increase protection for consumers and children.

Marketing communications activity in paid-for space online is already covered by ASA. But the extended remit could come into force by Q3 2010.

A release from the ASA states:

Currently, the ASA’s online remit covers paid-for marketing communications such as pop-up and banner ads, paid-search and viral ads. However, nearly two thirds of the complaints that we receive about online marketing activity are not presently covered by the code. The proposed extension of our remit will plug this regulatory gap, ensuring that consumers enjoy the same level of protection on websites as they do in paid-for space.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Similar posts:

NUJ members in Manchester join forces after MEN sale

February 19th, 2010 | No Comments | Posted by in Job losses, Journalism, Media releases, Newspapers

More than a 100 NUJ members at the Manchester Evening News and its weekly counterparts are forming a joint chapel to strengthen the union’s rights and help prevent job losses.

The move follows the recent announcement of the MEN Media titles’ sale to Trinity Mirror and the union’s fears that it could lead to future job cuts.

NUJ also raised concerns that moving journalists from the communities they serve poses a threat to media diversity and plurality in the north west.

Journalism.co.uk reported last week that Trinity Mirror wants MEN staff to move from the Manchester base to Oldham, a proposal that was critised by MEN union members.

MEN mother of chapel Judy Gordon and MEN Weeklies mother of chapel Bethan Dorsett said in a joint statement: “Though traditionally the MEN and weeklies have been separate chapels, it is common sense to bring them together. After all we are now under one roof.

“A strong, united chapel made up of over 100 journalists can take positive action to prevent any job losses or other damaging changes that our new owners may want to implement at a later stage.”

NUJ general secretary Jeremy Dear welcomes the move: “This is a big step forward for our members in Manchester and gives them added strength at a very important time.”

The deal with Trinity Mirror is to be completed on March 28.

Tags: , , ,

Similar posts:

Comedy stars stage benefit gig for libel reform

Comedians, scientists and politicians will joins forces to stage a West End show aimed at speaking out against UK libel laws.

The Big Libel Gig will take place at London’s Palace Theatre on Sunday, 14 March 2010.

Hosting the gig will be comedian Robin Ince, co-creator of the event alongside science writer Simon Singh. As previously reported on Journalism.co.uk, Singh is currently facing libel charges brought by the British Chiropractic Association.

Singh has been granted leave to appeal Mr Justice Eady’s intial ruling, and the appeal will take place on 22 February.

In a press release about the event, Singh says: “Peter Wilmshurst, Ben Goldacre and I will talk about being sued for libel. Peter is being sued for raising concerns about a heart device. He faces bankruptcy by coming up against our draconian libel laws. We are all put at risk if doctors and scientists are scared to speak out because of English libel laws.”

The gig will conclude Libel Reform Week, which according to its organisers the Coalition for Libel Reform aims to “urge political parties to commit to major reforms before the election”.

The coalition – which will receive all funds raised by the Big Libel Gig – was established by the charities Index on Censorship, English PEN and Sense About Science.

The confirmed line-up includes Dara Ó Briain, Tim Minchin, Marcus Brigstocke, Robin Ince, Ed Byrne, Shappi Khorsandi and Professor Brian Cox.

Tickets are now on sale on Seetickets.com.

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Similar posts:

Media release: FT acquires Medley Global Advisors

February 3rd, 2010 | No Comments | Posted by in Media releases, Newspapers

Owner of the Financial Times, Pearson, has announced its acquisition of Medley Global Advisors LLC (MGA), a company that provides “macro policy intelligence” to investment banks, hedge funds and asset manager.

MGA, which had estimated gross assets of $7.3 million at the year end, will continue to operate from its headquarters in New York, with offices in Washington DC, London, Frankfurt, Beijing and Tokyo.

“The acquisition strengthens the FT’s position as a global leader in premium financial information,” said a release from the FT.

“The acquisition will enhance the FT’s portfolio of services geared towards major global financial institutions and asset managers, including FTfm, its global fund management supplement, and Money-Media, the market leader in online news and commentary for the fund management sector.

“This acquisition delivers another premium service to an important FT audience and reinforces our strategy of building strong subscriber and digital businesses in core sectors,” said John Ridding, chief executive of the FT.

Full announcement at this link…

Tags: , , ,

Similar posts:

Media release: PCC remit to include online-only publications

After an industry-wide consultation, the Press Standards Board of Finance Ltd (PressBoF) has announced it will extend the remit of the Press Complaints Commission (PCC) to include online-only publications. This will mainly apply to online magazines, it said in its release.

Pressbof, independent of the PCC, is responsible for raising a levy on the newspaper and magazine industry to finance the Commission.

The extension has been agreed on these terms:

1. Such publications must be recognisable as UK based newspapers or magazines which, if in printed form, would come within the jurisdiction of the PCC.

2. The publisher and editor must subscribe to the Editors’ Code of Practice.

3. The publisher must agree to pay registration fees to PressBoF.

“The internet is an increasingly important platform for publishers to reach consumers. While online versions of newspapers and magazines available in printed form come within the remit of the PCC, there is a gap to the extent that online-only publications do not,” said Guy Black, chairman of PressBoF.

“This decision is a logical development in self-regulation, recognising the moves in the magazine sector towards online-only titles, and underlines the effectiveness of our system.”

Baroness Buscombe, chairman of the PCC, said she welcomed the decision by the industry:

“The PCC needs this freedom to develop rapidly to meet the challenges and the opportunities presented by media convergence. One clear strength of the self-regulatory system is its flexibility to adapt to changing circumstances, while still providing a service that is free, fast, discreet and which involves the public in its decision-making.”

Full release at this link…

Tags: , ,

Similar posts:

Media Release: Newspaper Society launches new audience measuring system

The Newspaper Society has launched Locally Connected, what it calls ‘the UK’s first integrated print and online audience currency’.

It’s a new way of measuring newpapers’ print and online reach: “The development of a robust and reliable system of multimedia audience measurement has been one of the biggest challenges facing all media today,” said NS president, David Fordham.

“Locally Connected now gives advertisers a unique cross-media planning system, allowing them to effectively target local communities across the UK in print as well as online.”

To mark its launch, the NS announced that research conducted by Telmar showed websites extend local newspaper audience reach by 14 per cent, ‘particularly among upmarket and core middle age groups’.

“On average the research shows us that a monthly online campaign in conjunction with a single advertisement in the newspaper will increase reach by 14 per cent- and in some cases much more,” said Dick Dodson, managing director of Telmar Europe.
“This additional reach will be more upmarket and in the core 25-64 age group since the website audiences are significantly biased towards these groups compared to the newspaper audiences.”

In addition, the NS is carrying out a ‘qualitative digital insight project’ which will look at how people engage with their local newspaper website.

Full release at this link…

Tags: , , ,

Similar posts:

Media Release: BBC appoints Alex Gubbay as first social media editor

While Journalism.co.uk was away conferencing, the BBC announced Alex Gubbay as its first social media editor.

Gubbay, currently interactive sports news editor for BBC sport, will take up the role in January.

He will lead ‘editorial development of user-generated content [UGC] and social media initiatives across the newsroom’, said the release, including taking over management of the BBC’s UGC hub.

Full release at this link…

Tags: ,

Similar posts:

Media Release: London Lite to publish last edition on Friday

November 9th, 2009 | 2 Comments | Posted by in Media releases, Newspapers

Associated Newspapers’ freesheet, the London Lite, will publish its last edition on Friday 13 November, according to a release.

The decision follows a consultation with staff.

Full release at this link…

In August, News International, the UK newspaper division of News Corporation announced that it would close thelondonpaper, its free evening newspaper launched in 2006.

Meanwhile, the Evening Standard, in which Associated still has a minority share, switched from paid-for to free last month.

Tags: ,

Similar posts:

© Mousetrap Media Ltd. Theme: modified version of Statement